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Wednesday, October 4
 

8:00am

Quiet Room + Charging Station
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking in this room please.

If you need a working space we have Doheny Ballroom A for you to hangout and chat with colleagues.

Wednesday October 4, 2017 8:00am - 11:30am
Crescent Bay AB

8:00am

Working Space + Charging Station + Luggage Hold
Do you need to catch up with colleagues, feel free to meet up in this space. If you need a quiet space to work, check out Crescent AB instead.

We are also offering an area where you can store your luggage. 

Wednesday October 4, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Doheny A

9:00am

Hotel Irvine to Student Center (2 Shuttles)
Hotel Irvine pick-ups are located by the loading dock in front of EATS restaurant. 

Hotel Irvine Guests: We will only be providing a one-time pick up. If you miss the buses you may need to use Uber/Lyft/taxi to travel to UC Irvine. 

Wednesday October 4, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Hotel Irvine

9:00am

Duke to Student Center (Taxis)
DML will reserve transportation for you. Taxis will pick-up in the parking lot adjacent to the property. Please make sure to arrive early.

Duke Hotel, Newport Beach  Guests: We will only be providing a one-time pick up. If you miss the buses you may need to use Uber/Lyft/taxi to travel to UC Irvine. 

Wednesday October 4, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Duke Hotel

9:30am

Pre-Conference Workshops

Pre-conference Workshop, Wednesday, October 4, 2017

The pre-conference workshop day offers deep dives into hands-on workshops, mini-courses, and working sessions with top experts in the field. Topics range from courses in media making, learning analytics, program evaluation, and game design, to working sessions focused on delving into cutting edge problems in research and practice.

In order to view the full workshop descriptions and applications forms see the descriptions below or click here.

Buffet lunch will be provided for all workshop participants from noon to 2 PM (Pacific Ballroom D).

*Main conference passes do not include pre-conference workshops. Workshops require separate registration. Space is limited, passes remain available until the workshops are full.


CATERING SCHEDULE

9:00 AM Morning Break (Coffee and cookies) @ Pacific Ballroom D

12:30 - 2:00 PM Buffet Lunch (Vegetarian/Vegan Friendly) @ Pacific Ballroom D

3:00 PM Afternoon Break (Coffee and cookies)  @ Pacific Ballroom D


EVENT SCHEDULE

Designing Connected Research for Equity and Justice: Building Partnerships through Collaborative Inquiry and Participatory Practice

9:30 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Emerald Bay A | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

6 hours | 20 Participant Maximum

Cost: $100

Nicole Mirra | Rutgers University | Email: nicole.mirra@gmail.com | Twitter: @Nicole_Mirra

Bill Penuel l University of Colorado, Boulder | Email: William.Penuel@colorado.edu | Twitter: @bpenuel

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/designing-connec…h-equity-justice/


Preparing Teachers for the Connected Learning Ecology Through Playful Practice Spaces

9:30 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Pacific Ballroom A | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

6 hours | 20 Participant Maximum

Cost: $100

Torrey Trust | University of Massachusetts Amherst | Email: t1trust@gmail.com | Twitter: @torreytrust

Dan Roy | MIT Teaching Systems Lab | Email: danroy@mit.edu | Twitter: @danroy

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/preparing-teache…-practice-spaces/


Designing Learning Games - an XCD Approach

9:30 – 12:30 | University of California, Irvine. Emerald Bay C | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

6 hours | 25 Participant Maximum

Cost: $75

Eric Klopfer | MIT The Education Arcade | Email: klopfer@mit.edu

Scot Osterweil | MIT The Education Arcade | Email: scot_o@mit.edu

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/designing-learni…mes-xcd-approach/


Staking Your Claim: How the Open Web is Won for Teaching & Learning

9:30 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Pacific Ballroom B | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

6 hours | 20 Participant Maximum

Cost: $100

Kim Jaxon | Cal State University, Chico | Email: kjaxon@csuchico.edu | Twitter: @drjaxon

Alan Levine | Barks and plays on the web | Email: cogdogblog@gmail.com | Twitter: @cogdog

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/staking-claim-op…eaching-learning/

Connecting Youth Interests to Success: Frameworks and Strategies for Informal Educators

9:30 – 12:30 | University of California, Irvine. Room: Emerald Bay B| Wednesday, October 4, 2017

3 hours | 40 Participant Maximum

Cost: $50

Crystle Martin | DML Research Hub | Email: crystle.martin@gmail.com | Twitter: @crystlem

Linda Braun | LEO: Librarians & Educators Online | Email: lbraun@leonline.com | Twitter: @lbraun2000

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/pathways-connect…lifelong-success/


Why Making is Important to Assessment  and  Why Assessment is Important to Making: Probing the Opportunities and Challenges of  this Interdependent Relationship in K-12 Settings

9:30 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Woods Cove AB | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

6 hours | 20 Participant Maximum

Cost: $100

Jessica Parker | Maker Ed | Email: Jessica@MakerEd.Org | Twitter: @JessicaKParker

Stephanie Chang | Maker Ed | Email: Stephanie@MakerEd.Org | Twitter: @heyasteph

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/making-important…important-making/


Learning Analytics in Informal Spaces

2:00 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Doheny B | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

3 hours | 20 Participant Maximum

Cost: $50

Caitlin K. Martin | Digital Youth Network | Email: cmartin@digitalyouthnetwork.org  | Twitter: @caitlinkm

Charles Lang | Teachers College, Columbia University | Email: charles.lang@nyu.edu

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/learning-analytics-informal-spaces/


From Good Intentions to Real Outcomes: Equity by Design in Learning Technologies

9:30 – 5:00 | University of California, Irvine. Room: Emerald Bay D/E | Wednesday, October 4, 2017

6 hours | 40 Participant Maximum

Cost: $100

Justin Reich | MIT Teaching Systems Lab | Twitter: @bjfr

Mizuko Ito | University of California, Irvine | Twitter: @mizuko

https://dml2017.dmlhub.net/workshops/good-intentions-…ing-technologies/


 

 


Wednesday October 4, 2017 9:30am - 11:30am
UC Irvine

5:30pm

Student Center on a loop to Hotel Irvine and Duke (2 Shuttles)
Pick-up area is adjacent to the main UCI administration building. Please ask registration desk for directions on how to get there.

Wednesday October 4, 2017 5:30pm - 6:00pm
Admin Building (by Flagpole)
 
Thursday, October 5
 

8:00am

Break - Coffee Service
Thursday October 5, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Pacific Ballroom D

8:00am

Quiet Room + Charging Station
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking in this room please.

If you need a working space we have Doheny Ballroom A for you to hangout and chat with colleagues.

Thursday October 5, 2017 8:00am - 11:30am
Crescent Bay AB

8:00am

Working Space + Charging Station + Luggage Hold
Do you need to catch up with colleagues, feel free to meet up in this space. If you need a quiet space to work, check out Crescent AB instead.

We are also offering an area where you can store your luggage. 

Thursday October 5, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Doheny A

8:30am

Hotel Irvine to Student Center (3 Shuttles)
Hotel Irvine pick-ups are located by the loading dock in front of EATS restaurant. Buses will leave promptly. Please make sure to arrive early.

Hotel Irvine Guests: We will only be providing a one-time pick up. If you miss the buses you may need to use Uber/Lyft/taxi to travel to UC Irvine. 

Thursday October 5, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Hotel Irvine

8:30am

Duke to Student Center (Taxis)
DML will reserve transportation for you. Taxis will pick-up in the parking lot adjacent to the property. Please make sure to arrive early.

Duke Hotel, Newport Beach  Guests: We will only be providing a one-time pick up. If you miss the buses you may need to use Uber/Lyft/taxi to travel to UC Irvine. 

Thursday October 5, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Duke Hotel

9:00am

danah boyd - Learning All the Wrong Things

A decade ago, my collaborators and I imagined a world of participatory culture where young people would be empowered to actively and strategically use technology to engage with the world around them.  Through a mixture of peer learning, self-learning, and formal education, we saw many young people develop sophisticated understandings of how to use social media to their advantage. Yet, not all of the practices that emerged as a result are inherently positive.  From the rise of pro-Ana communities to the trolling associated with #Gamergate to the strategic manipulation of media for racist agendas, we’ve seen a form of participatory culture emerge that can be unhealthy, cruel, and socially devastating. 

In this talk, I will interrogate some of the darker sides of networked media engagement: media manipulation, strategic harassment, and youth radicalization. And then we’ll think through different kinds of interventions - and the unintended consequences of good intentions in a world where the internet mirrors and magnifies the good, bad, and ugly. 


danah boyd is the founder and president of Data & Society, a research institute focused on understanding the role of data-driven technologies in society. She is also a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and a Visiting Professor at ITP at New York University. Dr. boyd is a 2011 Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She is a Director of both Crisis Text Line and Social Science Research Council, and a Trustee of the National Museum of the American Indian. She sits on advisory boards for Electronic Privacy Information Center, Brown University Department of Computer Science, and the School of Information at the University of Michigan.

Dr. boyd's research focuses on the intersection of technology, society, and policy. She is currently doing work on questions related to bias in "big data" and artificial intelligence, how people negotiate privacy and publicity, and the social ramifications of using data in education, criminal justice, labor, and public life. For over a decade, she examined how American youth incorporate social media into their daily practices in light of different fears and anxieties that the public has about young people's engagement with technologies like MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and texting. She has researched a plethora of teen issues, ranging from privacy to bullying, racial inequality to sexual identity. Her early findings were published in "Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media." Her 2014 monograph "It's Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens" has received widespread praise from scholars, parents, and journalists and has been translated into 7 languages. This work was funded by both the MacArthur Foundation and Microsoft Research. In her most recent collaborative book project - "Participatory Culture in a Networked Era" - she worked with Mimi Ito and Henry Jenkins to reflect on how digital participations has shaped different parts of society.

In 2010, Dr. boyd won the CITASA Award for Public Sociology. The Financial Times dubbed Dr. boyd "The High Priestess of Internet Friendship" while Fortune Magazine identified her as the smartest academic in tech. She was identified as one of Technology Review's 2010 Young Innovators under 35 (TR35). Her work has been profiled by numerous publications, including the New York TimesFast Company, the Boston Globe, and Forbes Magazine.

She was a Commissioner on the 2008-2009 Knight Commission on Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy. From 2009-2013, danah served on the World Economic Forum’s Social Media Global Agenda Council. At the Berkman Center, Dr. boyd co-directed the Internet Safety Technical Task Force in 2008 with John Palfrey and Dena Sacco to work with companies and non-profits to identify potential technical solutions for keeping children safe online. This Task Force was formed by the U.S. Attorneys General and MySpace and is being organized by the Berkman Center. More recently, Dr. boyd co-directed the Youth Media and Policy Working Group with John Palfrey and Urs Gasser; this project was funded by the MacArthur Foundation from 2009-2011. In 2012, she and John Palfrey also helped the Born This Way Foundation and the MacArthur Foundation develop a research strategy to help empower youth to address meanness and cruelty. She is one of the hosts of the annual Data & Civil Rights Conference. Since 2015, she has also served on the US Commerce Department's Data Advisory Council.

Dr. boyd received a bachelor's degree in computer science from Brown University (under Andy van Dam), a master's degree in sociable media from MIT Media Lab (under Judith Donath), and a Ph.D in Information from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008 (under Peter Lyman and Mimi Ito). She has worked as an ethnographer and social media researcher for various corporations, including Intel, Tribe.net, Google, and Yahoo! She also created and managed a large online community for V-Day, a non-profit organization working to end violence against women and girls worldwide. She has advised numerous other companies, sits on corporate, education, conference, and non-profit advisory boards, and regularly speaks at a wide variety of conferences and events.

Dr. boyd has published dozens of articles in a wide range of scholarly venues, blogs at http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/ and tweets at @zephoria


Thursday October 5, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Pacific Ballroom D

10:30am

Break - Coffee and Snacks
Thursday October 5, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Pacific Ballroom D

11:00am

Family Learning: Intergenerational Dynamics Across Learning Spaces

Family Learning: Intergenerational Dynamics Across Learning Spaces
Provocation: How do we increase educational and digital equity through family involvement
Discussant: Mizuko Ito
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 


Drop In to Skatepark Design: Connected Family Physics Gaming in a Children’s Museum
Jeremy Dietmeier, University of Iowa 

Contextualizing Connectivity: How Internet Quality and Parental Factors Impact Lower-Income Children’s Technology Use
Vikki Katz, Rutgers University 

Building A Stronger Connection: Low-Income Parents Fostering Connected Learning
Melissa Brough, Cal State University, Northridge 

Embrace, Balance, Resist: How Parents Engage with Connected Learning
Alicia Blum-Ross


Families, Learning, and Pokemon Go

Kelly Tran, Arizona State University



 

 





Moderators
avatar for Mizuko Ito

Mizuko Ito

DML Research Director, UCHRI
Professor Mizuko Ito is a cultural anthropologist of technology use, examining children and youth’s changing relationships to media and communications and is Professor in Residence and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning at the University of California, Irvine, with appointments in the University of California Humanities Research Institute, the Department of Anthropology, and the Department of Informatics. Her work on educational software appears in Engineering Play: A Cultural History of... Read More →

Speakers
AB

Alicia Blum-Ross

Research Officer, Parenting for a Digital Future, London School of Economics and Political Science
avatar for Melissa Brough

Melissa Brough

Assistant Professor, Cal State University Northridge
JD

Jeremy Dietmeier

University of Iowa
VK

Vikki Katz

Associate Professor, Rutgers School of Communication & Information
avatar for Kelly Tran

Kelly Tran

PhD Candidate, Arizona State University
PhD Student at Arizona State University.



Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Doheny CD

11:00am

Games and Learning Research

Games and Learning Research
Provocation: How do we study learning transfer and problem solving practices through games?
Discussant: Andrew Phelps
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 

Failing Up: The Role of Difficulty and Failure in an Educational Video Game
Craig Anderson, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Smarter and Faster: Integrating Intelligent Tutoring Systems Into Video Games
Elizabeth Whitaker, Georgia Tech Research Institute

From Dragon Slayer to Problem Solver: Video Games as a Warm-Up for Problem Solving
Beth Veinott, Michigan Technological University

Games as Complex Spaces: Operationalizing Steinkuehler's Six Modes of Participation in MMOs
Jeff Kuhn, Ohio University

Where the Wild Things Are: Call of Duty, Boys
Jason Engerman, East Stroudsburg University




Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Craig G. Anderson

Craig G. Anderson

University of California - Irvine
JE

Jason Engerman

Assistant Professor, East Stroudsburg University
JK

Jeff Kuhn

Ohio University
BV

Beth Veinott

Associate Professor, Michigan Technological University



Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay C

11:00am

Innovations in Teachers’ Professional Development

Innovations in Teachers’ Professional Development
Provocation: How do we support teachers’ digital identities and practices?
Discussant: Kim Jaxon
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 


Coding Core: Helping Teachers Teach for the Future
Ann Marie Carrothers, Mozilla Foundation Hive Chicago

Not Just Coding: Preparing Preservice Teachers to Develop and Foster Computational Thinking in Technology Integration
Yu-Hui Chang, Ph.D. Candidate, Learning Technologies program, Dept. of C&I, LT Media Lab, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities
Lana Peterson, Ph.D. Candidate, Learning Technologies program, Dept. of C&I, LT Media Lab, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Using Web-Based Practical Measures to Support Improvement at Scale: Insights from a Research-Practice Partnership
Daniela DiGiacomo, University of California Riverside

Blogs and Book Clubs: Educators' Reflection on Practice in Public Spaces
Suzanne Porath, Kansas State University  

Making Online Professional Development Program Accessible to Educators Worldwide
Yumiko Murai, MIT Media Lab


 



Moderators
avatar for Kim Jaxon

Kim Jaxon

Associate Professor, English, CSU, Chico
I'm an associate professor of English (Composition & Literacy) at California State University, Chico. My research interests focus on theories of literacy, particularly digital literacies, the teaching of writing, participation, course design, and teacher education. In my research... Read More →

Speakers
AM

Ann Marie Carrothers

Digital Operations, Mozilla Foundation
avatar for Yu-Hui Chang

Yu-Hui Chang

PhD Candidate, University of Minnesota
DD

Daniela DiGiacomo

Postdoctoral Researcher, UCR
YM

Yumiko Murai

Postdoctoral Associate, MIT
avatar for Lana Peterson

Lana Peterson

PD & Community Engagement Coordinator, University of Minnesota
SP

Suzanne Porath

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University



Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Pacific Ballroom B

11:00am

Building Learning Pathways in a Connected Learning World through DiscoverDesign.org
Design thinking can be used as a learning tool tool that moves youth from consumption to production using a structured design process. How might we leverage design thinking and process to engage youth in authentic design and real-world opportunities? How can design move youth from consumers of media to producers of their own learning. Join Chicago Architecture Foundation for an introduction to DiscoverDesign.org and how to effectively use design thinking and process to build learning pathways. Learn how to develop collaboration, communication and problem-solving skills with youth through playlists. Remix and create your own design challenges incorporating a mix of digital and nondigital tools. Encourage youth to work on real-world design problems and enter into national and local competitions to unlock opportunities.

In this 90-minute teach-In, CAF will show how participants can begin to introduce youth with little-to-no design experience to design thinking through a structured methodology and entry level interactions called playlists. Teach-in participants will work together to translate skills and principles into participatory, action-oriented playlists for youth success and self-efficacy in a connected learning world. 

Workshop participants will then work to explore how youth can move from building discreet skills through playlists towards authentic design. Participants will use design thinking to translate relevant opportunities in their curricula into design challenges.

The workshop will also provide time for discussion on how design thinking and design process can be used in multiple contexts. What makes a good problem? What skills are translatable? How essential is design thinking and design process for success in a connected learning world?

Speakers
GL

Gabe Lyon

Vice President, Education and Experience, Chicago Architecture Foundation


Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay A

11:00am

Connected Learning to Promote Equitable Participation in STEAM
The emergence of STEAM education, a transdisciplinary approach that focuses on problem-solving (Delaney, 2014), is occurring worldwide, albeit with growing pains. As STEAM education continues to gain momentum, STEAM educators are trying to understand this new approach and distinguish it from STEM (Authors 2&1, 2016). Our research team conducted a 3-year longitudinal study that determined several differences between STEAM and STEM including: authentic transdisciplinarity, which foregrounds the problem and allows the disciplines to emerge naturally; arts as a part of the problem-solving process instead of an add-on; and employing a variety of methods and perspectives (e.g. drawing on interest-based learning, social justice issues) to solve problems (Authors 1&2, 2016). We view STEAM as a way to engage learners that have been historically disenfranchised from STEM. With little available literature regarding the efficacy of STEAM practices, educators have limited support to design or enact STEAM teaching (Henriksen, Mehta, & Mishra, 2014). This limitation often relegates educators to using existing STEM models and attempting to ‘add-on’ experiences with the arts (Kim & Park, 2012). 

This “Teach-In” broadens the conversations around STEAM by (1) presenting a research-based conceptual model of STEAM educational practices, (2) exploring how digital media (game and media creation) can assist in problem solving, and (3) examining a rubric created to assess student collaboration in STEAM activities (Authors, 2017) as a means to support educators in implementing STEAM instruction. We will examine ways participation is increased when engaging students with relevant problem solving, using connected learning ideals, and diversifying the types of knowledge/abilities valued to ensure more equitable instruction and participation.

Through a combination of presentation and hands-on work, the facilitators will lead the participants through the goals of this workshop which include:
1. To introduce a STEAM instructional model.
2. To demonstrate how this instructional model incorporates equitable participation through problem-based scenarios.
3. To present teacher-created problem-based scenarios connected to the community, relevant to students’ lives, and representative of real-world issues.
4. To have participants iterate the scenarios while exploring the opportunities of digital tools to contribute to equitable participation. 
5. To examine and practice using the collaboration rubric.

Speakers
avatar for Danielle Herro

Danielle Herro

Associate Professor of Digital Media and Learning, Clemson University
I study game-based curricula and learning in K-12 classrooms, teach courses on the potential of games, social media and emerging technologies to promote learning, and most recently have begun large-scale initiatives to move STEAM practices into schools.
avatar for Cassie Quigley

Cassie Quigley

Associate Professor, Clemson University
Dr. Cassie Quigley is an Associate Professor of Science Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning. She received her doctorate in Curriculum & Instruction at Indiana University in 2010. During her time as a high school biology and physics teacher, she often witnessed st... Read More →


Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Pacific Ballroom A

11:00am

Creative Entry Points into Coding: New Resources for Engaging Diverse Learners
How can you engage young people in creating their own games, music, art, and other projects while learning to code? Join this session to try out new coding cards and other resources to help youth get started coding projects with Scratch (scratch.mit.edu). 

Currently, most introductory coding activities focus on engaging children in solving puzzles. In this session, we present a more creative approach that builds on young people's interests. 

Start by exploring a Scratch “microworld” - a simplified version of the Scratch project editor. Each microworld contains a small set of blocks for making creative projects based on a theme. Then, dive into creating your own project using the new Scratch coding cards. Choose from a variety of interest areas, including dance, fashion, storytelling, and games. Share your experience and brainstorm ways you could adapt these activities to connect with the interests of young people you work with. Bring a laptop to dig into Scratch during the session. 

This session grows out of our research and development of diverse entry points into coding as part of the NSF-funded Coding for All initiative. The Scratch Team at the MIT Media Lab—in collaboration with the DML Research Hub at University of California Irvine and the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University—are creating and investigating more interest-based pathways into computational fluency, particularly for youth from underrepresented groups in computing.


Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay B

11:00am

Exploring Openness Across Learning and Technical Contexts with HIPC III
The Hive Interoperability & Portability Coalition III, an interorganizational partnership out of Chicago, has established a Community of Practice to explore and advance Openness and related concepts like Transparency, Agency, and Portability as they pertain to both designing learning environments and technology solutions. This Teach-In will emulate the CoP for DML attendees with hands-on games, conversation, and collaborative discovery.  We will explore openness in the contexts of technical development, learning design, and game play.

HIPC III (a partnership between the Adler Planetarium, Forall Systems, and Ci3’s GameChanger Chicago with support from the Hive Chicago Learning Network) aims to improve the Hive Chicago community’s understanding of the open web. Over the course of the current funding cycle, the HIPC III partners are providing six workshops, open to learning program providers in Chicago, that endeavor to get program providers up to speed on concepts intrinsic to Hive Chicago, whose goal is to create opportunities for teens that advance the promise of the Internet for learning, in ways and contexts that are accessible to them. The workshops will emphasize fun, game-based activities that straddle digital and analog frameworks for understanding.

Speakers

Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Emerald Bay DE

11:00am

Textile Messages: Electronic Textiles as Disruptive Designs and Inclusive Activities
At the first DML conference in 2010, we introduced electronic textiles as a new material and context for making: stitching circuits with conductive thread rather than soldering wires on fabric to make soft garments rather than robots and rockets. Since then electronic textiles have taken off and used to promote the learning of coding, engineering, science and more inside and outside of schools. In this panel, we bring together original as well as new participants to showcase various applications and contexts that have been developed for making and learning with electronic textiles. We provide examples of how teachers use electronic textiles to teach science and programming in their classrooms. We discuss ways in which e-textiles offer a "disruptive corner" for engaging girls and minority students in the scientific thinking conversations absent in their classes. This panel is timely for the maker movement in education, as educators and scholars shift from introducing the “new” idea of making to refining and implementing ideas in ways that reach more students, schools, and communities in rigorous ways.

Yasmin Kafai (University of Pennsylvania) will provide an overview and introduction to electronic textiles. Kylie Peppler (Indiana University) will present in “Materializing Designs” how youth in community centers engage with electronic textiles to learn about crafting and circuit designs. Colby Tofel-Grehl (Utah State University) will present “‘He asked me:' Changing the Conversations in Science Classrooms with Electronic Textiles,” concerning the shifts toward more open discourse led by secondary school science teachers implementing e-textiles in their classes. Tamara Clegg (University of Maryland) will showcase in “BodyVis: E-textiles for Body Learning and Scientific Inquiry” how wearables can be used to teach about anatomy and physiology. Nichole Pinkard and Caitlin Martin (DePaul University) will talk about the “Digital Divas” program using middle school girls’ narratives in e-textile designs. Deborah Fields (Utah State University) will report in “Stitching the Loop: E-textiles in Exploring Computer Science” on the development and implementation of an electronic textile high school curriculum with hundreds of LAUSD students. Finally, Leah Buechley, the inventor of the LilyPad Ardiuno, the first electronic textile construction kit will provide comments and updates where the design of electronic textiles is heading next.

Speakers
LB

Leah Buechley

Designer, Rural Digital
avatar for Deborah Fields

Deborah Fields

Independent Research Consultant & Temporary Assistant Professor of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital... Read More →
CT

Colby Tofel-Grehl

Assistant Professor of Science Education, Utah State University


Thursday October 5, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Doheny B

12:30pm

Lunch - On Your Own
On your own! Explore great eats around UC Irvine.

Thursday October 5, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
TBA

12:30pm

FREE Event+ Lunch: Contra Deportation: Fighting Injustice With Electronic Civil Disobedience

Working with activists, artists and hackers, Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT) staged a virtual sit-in to stop the German government from using commercial airlines to deport undocumented refugees and immigrants. Ricardo Dominguez, EDT co-founder, will speak about the electronic civil disobedience action and its effect and reveal how activists can duplicate his efforts to fight social injustice in the USA and globally today.

Members of the UCI community and beyond are invited to attend this event free of charge Thursday, October 5, 2017, Doheny B, hosted by the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub 2017 Conference. Lunch will be provided. No RSVP necessary.


Dominguez, UC San Diego associate professor of visual arts, and his theater group first developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatista communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. More recently, he and his partners developed the Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project (http://tbt.tome.press/) and the Transborder Immigrant Tool (a GPS cell phone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/US border), which won the “Transnational Communities Award” (2008), funded by Cultural Contact, Endowment for Culture Mexico–US, CALIT2 and the UC San Diego Center for the Humanities. The Transborder Immigrant Tool has been exhibited at myriad international venues. The project, under investigation by the U.S. Congress in 2009-2010, was reviewed by conservative radio and TV commentator Glenn Beck in 2010, who said that it potentially “dissolved” the U.S. border with its poetry.



Speakers
avatar for Ricardo Dominquez

Ricardo Dominquez

Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab, Ricardo Dominguez
Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project ( http://bang.transreal.org/) with Brett Stalbaum, Micha Cardenas, Amy Sara Carroll, and Elle Mehrmand, the Transborder Immigrant Tool (a GPS cell phone safety net tool for crossing the Mexico/US border) was the winner of... Read More →


Thursday October 5, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Pacific Ballroom D

2:00pm

Beyond Initial Engagement: Supporting Youth Development in Creative Online Communities
Young people are constructing cities together in Minecraft, collaborating on interactive animations in Scratch, and sharing e-textile inventions on iRemix. Yet, many youth only browse online platforms and miss the opportunities for deeper participation and learning through making. How can we help more young people become engaged in collaborating and contributing in creative online communities? 

In this session, we will share observations and suggestions on ways to support young people's deeper engagement and learning in creative platforms, such as Connected Camps with Minecraft, Scratch, and iRemix. We'll address the following questions:

- How are youth benefiting from participation in creative online communities? 
- How are these communities designed to support youth development and participation?
- How can educators, parents, and mentors play a role in supporting young people's motivation and participation? 

The goal of the interactive discussion will be to identify ways to help more young people go beyond initial engagement to deeper participation.

Each of the panelists will share strategies and experiences from their creative online platforms. Ricarose Roque and Natalie Rusk will share what they have learned from youth who have grown up participating in the Scratch online community about what keeps them engaged. Mimi Ito will share reflections on the role of mentorship in online communities based on her work supporting online Minecraft camps through Connected Camps. Denise Nacu will offer suggestions based on her research on the Digital Youth Network’s iRemix platform to understand and encourage engagement among youth from underrepresented groups.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Nacu

Denise Nacu

Assistant Professor, DePaul University


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay DE

2:00pm

Capturing Connected Learning in Libraries: A Mini Evaluation Workshop for Librarians and Educators
The Capturing Connected Learning in Libraries (CCLL) project addresses the urgent and growing national need for evaluation approaches that reflect a new emphasis in libraries on digital, networked, and production-centered content, spaces, and programming. As leading specialists in assessment and evaluation in informal settings, we have developed and tested instruments for measuring connected learning that can be used for both improving services and demonstrating their value (http://researchtools.dmlhub.net). Libraries need evaluation resources (e.g., plans and tools) that help develop and improve their connected learning programming and document critical outcomes for youth participants. Such resources should be adaptable to reflect the variations in program populations (e.g., youth of different ages and backgrounds), focus (e.g. digital arts, programming), and lengths (e.g., pop up, drop in, longer term). 

In this mini workshop, we will introduce the CCLL project and provide two sets of practical evaluation tools that can be used for pop-up, drop-in, and longer-term Connected Learning-focused programs in libraries. Specifically, the examples we will present are being developed for science, technology, engineering, art, and math (STEAM) programs. For example, one of our partner libraries is interested in understanding the ways in which their youth and adult patrons use various technologies in their programming space; thus, some tools for evaluating this include “talk-back boards” and prompted photography to capture patrons’ experiences. In addition, short (2-3 min) post-session surveys of patrons will provide additional documentation of patrons’ experiences of Connected Learning key learning outcomes (e.g., peer support, interest powered). In the second half of the session, we will work with small groups to get feedback on the tools and help participants think about how to use these kinds of tools in their settings. We will give participants some tools to try out right away and ask for feedback on how well they might work as practical tools in their Connected Learning Settings. We will make these tools freely available online.


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny B

2:00pm

Community initiatives and technical platforms to understand and address equitable learning in Chicago
Recent research on how to support equitable STEM learning calls out the need to broker opportunities for youth to participate across settings and to make connections between formal and informal environments. In this panel presentation we share four interconnected projects designed to do this in Chicago at multiple levels:

City-wide learning initiative
The Chicago City of Learning (CCOL) is a city initiative using networked technologies to make out-of-school learning opportunities visible and available to youth and families in order to increase engagement during non-school time. Over 130 local organizations are involved and over 88,000 Chicago Public School (CPS) students have registered. We will specifically address engaging and supporting youth-serving organizations, including schools, as collaborators in the initiative.

Connected learning platform
The Chicago City of Learning platform was designed to make out-of-school time opportunities across the city searchable and sortable by subject, age, and geographic location and to provide account profiles for youth to develop portfolios of participation over time. Together, these allow visualizations of the informal STEM landscape in Chicago. We will share a features analysis and intentional design for different stakeholders in the learning ecology of Chicago, from organizers to educators to families.

Hyperlocal community ecosystem
Learning deserts suggested from CCOL mapping of STEM opportunities led to the launch the Bronzeville Fusion Network (BFN), a design-practice partnership to deepen collective understanding of how to strengthen learning ecosystems through a deep dive in one community. We will share the model and collaborative partnership strategies from the first year of work to identify and connect existing infrastructures, including CCOL, and overcome barriers such as transportation, space, and silos of expertise.

Caring adult network
Across the online and face-to-face programs from city-wide to local levels, individual adults in the lives of young people are key motivators. A series of workshops and communication practices, known as the Caring Adult Network (CAN), were designed to engage parents in BFN as STEM learning partners, connect them to each other and local resources, learn from them, and grow knowledge and confidence.

A synthesis discussion with the DML research and design community will close the session.


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny CD

2:00pm

Distributed Teaching and Learning Systems Across Virtual and Blended-Learning Environments
An important challenge that remains for supporting teaching and learning in digital-age contexts is developing systems that can help unify the diversity of pedagogical approaches aimed at supporting students through digital media technologies. This panel highlights three projects examining what such systems might look like across varying degrees of virtual, face-to-face, and blended contexts of learning. 

Distributed Teaching and Learning Systems, or DTALS (Gee & Gee, 2016; Holmes, Gee, & Tran, 2017, in press), can provide a useful framework for characterizing and analyzing elements of such systems. In a DTALS, teaching and learning are enacted not through a top-down model of knowledge transfer, but rather across a spectrum of designed and emergent experiences, negotiated between learners and experienced teachers, peers, mentors, or leaders in the community. 

In this panel, Jeff Holmes’ examination of “Videogames as Distributed Teaching and Learning Systems” in the Dota2 gaming community presents a model for characterizing core features of a DTALS. Kelly Tran’s research on “Informal Teaching and Learning in Pokemon Go” examines how DTALS in an augmented reality game can reveal how teaching and learning is enacted across physical and virtual contexts of gameplay. Finally, Earl Aguilera's presentation, “Library Code Clubs: Who is Doing the Teaching?” highlights tensions, challenges, and critical considerations of facilitating a DTALS as part of a blended learning experience. Together, these three projects demonstrate varying dimensions of DTALS as a means for unifying innovative pedagogies in a digital age.

This interactive presentation invites audience members to actively participate in constructing a DTALS during the presentations in order to experience (and challenge) the relevant implications for teaching and learning in the 21st Century.

References

Holmes, J. B., Tran, K. M., & Gee, E. R. (2017). Distributed Teaching and Learning Systems in the Wild. In M. F. Young & S. T. Slota (Eds.), Exploding the Castle: Rethinking How Video Games & Game Mechanics Can Shape the Future of Education (pp. 240–256). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Gee, J. P., & Gee, E. R. (2016). Games as distributed teaching and learning systems. Teachers College Record, Special Issue. Virtual Convergence: Creating Synergies between Research on Virtual Worlds and Videogames.

Speakers
avatar for Earl Aguilera

Earl Aguilera

Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Games and Impact, Arizona State University
Former HS English teacher | Doctoral candidate: Learning, Literacies, and Technologies | Studying the role of youth literacies in digital-age learning environments


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay C

2:00pm

Knitting, Sewing, Crocheting: Craft Endeavors around Ratio and Proportion
Craft communities can be powerful sites for production-centered, interest-driven, peer-supported learning, principles espoused by connected learning (Ito et al., 2013). Communities around textile crafts in particular, such as knitting circles, tend to be dominated by women, due to the long gendered histories of fiber-art production. These crafting practices are inherently mathematical, presenting mathematical activities women choose to participate in. 

Despite the lack of gender differences in mathematics achievement (Hyde, Lindberg, Linn, Ellis & Williams, 2008), women are underrepresented in STEM careers (US Census, 2011). Studies of females’ mathematical participation suggest that these discrepancies stem from the extent to which women feel welcome in math spaces (Alper, 1993; Boaler, 2002). School mathematics is frequently stripped of meaningful context; hands-on production restores this context, allowing students to develop a personal relationship with mathematical ideas.

Particularly exciting are the possibilities for these crafts to ignite new ways of knowing ratio and proportion and spatial visualization. Ratio and proportion are concepts traditionally taught in school (NGSS, 2017), while spatial visualization is not explicitly taught. Both have implications for engagement with the world and for success in some STEM fields, such as engineering ( Hegarty, Crookes, Dara-Abrams, & Shipley, 2010). Knitting, crocheting, and sewing offer three distinct ways of engaging these mathematical concepts, both simultaneously and separately. This suggests that these craft engagements may prepare children to be flexible in their ways of knowing math, relevant to authentic math-related challenges outside of school. In this session, we will break into three groups to separately explore these three crafts to actively explore these intriguing differences and interrelationships. In the teach-in, we will have three rotating tables through which participants can explore three crafts and their mathematical expressions. We will close with a whole-group discussion about the affordances and constraints of the crafts as “objects-to-think-with” (Papert, 1980) in mathematics education, how they can transform math classrooms, and possible implications for closing gender gaps in STEM.


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A

2:00pm

Media and Technology for Cognitive Enhancement throughout the Lifespan
The field of cognitive sciences has increasingly embraced the use of media and technology in assessing and enhancing people’s cognitive skills. This panel presents an interdisciplinary approach to bridge cognitive sciences, digital media/technology, and learning sciences. We first introduce our kid-friendly cognitive assessments (e.g., Child Risk Utility Measure), highlighting the affordances and contributions of digital media in understanding children’s thinking. Established cognitive measures tend to be aesthetically unappealing to children, and often fail to take into account their cognitive limitations. Digital media and technological tools allowed us to circumvent this issue by making cognitive tests into games that children enjoy.
We then discuss four research studies which use media and technology to help improve various cognitive functions. The first seeks to improve preschoolers’ spatial reasoning ability through songs and dance that emphasize spatial vocabulary and gesturing. The second aims to improve kindergartners’ numerical knowledge through digital games meant to train children’s domain-general executive function skills or domain-specific number sense. The third targets preteens with ADHD and aims to improve working memory and inhibition processes through scaffolding within a memory game. Finally, digital training games are not limited to children; tablet games also prove to be a crucial instrument for enhancing older adults’ performance on working memory tasks. Together, these studies emphasize the versatility of digital media and technology in improving people’s learning and learning abilities in individuals of all ages.

We close with an overview into further insights our aggregate data can provide. Specifically, analyses of data from similar media-and-game training studies can help pinpoint individual characteristics that allow people to benefit from the games. In the future, we hope that understanding individual differences through these analyses can help inform personalization of learning.

Presenters and Titles:
ES: A freshly baked perspective on how we measure risk propensity in children
GL: Gametizing Cognitive Tests
RK: A Song of Space and Kids to Go “Above, Above, Above”
GL/SK: Improving Mathematics through Playing Games
MW: Improving Working Memory and Assessing Motivation to Play
CP: Benefits of Tablet-Based Brain Training in Older Adults
SM: Can Machine Learning help predict Working Memory Training Gains?

Robert Kalinowski, University of California, Irvine, School of Education, rkalinow@uci.edu
Minnie Wu, University of California, Irvine, School of Education and School of Information and Computer Sciences, Department of Informatics, minniew@uci.edu
Chelsea Parlett, University of California, Irvine, School of Education, cparlett@uci.edu
Shafee Mohammed, University of California, Irvine, School of Education, shafeem@uci.edu

Speakers
RK

Robert Kalinowski

Student, UCI Eco Evo Bio
SM

Shafee Mohammed

Teaching Assistant, UCI
MW

Minnie Wu

Doctoral Student, University of California Irvine


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pacific Ballroom A

2:00pm

Mobile City Science: Youth Development through Community Mapping
Data-driven approaches using ubiquitous computing have the potential to democratize and decentralize urban planning and policy decisions, arguably making cities “smarter” and more connected. But what is the origin of this data? Whose lives do the data represent? Who has access to data from which to make recommendations for more equitable communities? 

Mobile City Science (MCS) is a community-based design and research project to understand and create new forms of techno-civic engagement for young people using mobile and location-based tools in their own neighborhoods. This four-part panel will share collective work from two cities engaging young people in MCS. 

First, Katie Headrick Taylor will share the origins, purpose, and theoretical basis for MCS. MCS originated as a collaboration with a bike workshop in a southern U.S. city to examine youth mobility deserts, leveraging geospatial applications and mobile devices for young people to map and visualize their activities within the places they frequent most. Young people used wearable cameras, GPS, and GIS technologies to access and use maps on-the-move and to annotate and create counter-maps of their communities. 

Next, Digital Youth Network (DYN) will share insights from MCS implementation in a freshman science class at a public high school in Chicago. DYN will focus on project adaptations made to better align with the intentions and infrastructure at the school site, and on unique student efforts to use counter-maps to tell their own stories and change existing narratives of their community. 

Third, the New York Hall of Science (NYSCI) will share MCS as part of its larger Queens 20/20 effort, focused on building an ecosystem for STEM learning in the local Corona community and creating a model for broad and deep networks of STEM-rich learning opportunities. The MCS project is located within the International High School for Health Sciences, a NYSCI partner, offering students the opportunity to explore the nearby densely populated and racially diverse immigrant community.

The presentation will conclude with synthesis comments from the current MCS external evaluator who will address project themes, mobile learning implications, and the importance of techno-civic engagement for the DML community.


Thursday October 5, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pacific Ballroom B

3:00pm

Break - Coffee and Snacks
Thursday October 5, 2017 3:00pm - 3:15pm
Pacific Ballroom D

3:15pm

Activating Parents Through SMS: The Comadre Pilot Project
This spotlight presents the results of a two-year-long design research project and pilot study aimed at increasing awareness of and participation in out-of-school learning opportunities among low-income, non-dominant families in Southern California. The project, called “Comadre,” is a free, bilingual, opt-in SMS service that periodically distributes information on low-cost or free out-of-school learning opportunities local to the user. This presentation will walk through the design research process that informs this study, from ethnographic research with families in Los Angeles to persona creation and design sprints to the results of a pilot deployment of a prototype of this technology in summer 2017. The presentation will invite attendees to consider the role of design, ethnography, parent and family needs, and digital media in crafting education solutions. This is the debut presentation of the findings from this research endeavor.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Cho

Alexander Cho

Postdoctoral Scholar, DML Hub
Design research, critical race theory, gender and sexuality studies, Tumblr, ethnography


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay DE

3:15pm

App Authors: Kids Designing, Creating, and Sharing Apps in Informal Learning Settings
The App Authors project connects youth with skills and tools to design, create, and share apps, introducing learners from all levels to coding and the design process. This multi-stage project is currently working with partner schools and public libraries in a variety of regions of the U.S. to iteratively build a curriculum that will be made publicly available at the end of our project, and contribute to scholarship examining how youth engage in informal learning about coding. We are supporting youth creators in developing problem solving and critical thinking skills while focusing on community sharing and introducing fundamental coding skills. The design of this curriculum is centered around reflective practice, and brings together the experiences and perspectives of youth, informal educators, formal educators and librarians, and designers. In addition to providing young people with early programming experience and a supportive environment for sharing their achievements, we are working to further establish the place of libraries (both school and public) as a site of opportunity to engage youth in STEM/STEAM exploration and digital development. We are wrestling with the importance of context for these activities, and addressing differences in audience, resource levels, duration of experience, and type of library with our curriculum design. Building on our experiences running the App Authors program multiple times in elementary school and public library settings, we are now expanding to train practitioners and observe how they implement this curriculum, with the goal of continued iteration based on their experiences. In addition to the practical elements of our work, we focus our research attention on understanding youth priorities for app development and their experiences within coding-oriented informal learning contexts, as well as best practices for developing these kinds of programs and how to tailor them to different settings and audiences. This session will detail the App Authors framework, current curriculum and findings, and will discuss open opportunities for future work in this arena.


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Pacific Ballroom A

3:15pm

Building the STEAM Shop Virtual Reality Pathway
PCHS has built one of the premiere public school makerspaces in California by tackling the challenges of resource allocation, curriculum innovation, and UC admission requirements. We are a makerspace with a mission: to offer underrepresented students increased access to STEM career and college pathways and our program won the 2016 CTE Makeover Challenge from the US Dept. of Education. This year we’ve emphasized emergent curriculum and student designed assessment, while developing new courses that blend Career Tech Education subjects with core academics, and launching a new STEAM Pod for our incoming 9th grade students. Our presentation will detail the rapid growth of our STEAM Shop Games and VR program. Our students attend IndieCade, VRLA and SIGGRAPH. They work with 360 cameras, low cost tools, high-end platforms and playtest new applications, like Mindshow. We embrace VR for storytelling, engagement, joy, learning and empathy. We are preparing our public high school students to have a seat at the table as the industry grows across the region and economy.

Speakers

Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Doheny B

3:15pm

Civic Imagination: Roadmaps, Stories, Research and Calls to Action
2016 was marked by divisive politics and humanitarian disasters including the Brexit referendum, the U.S. presidential campaign and the ongoing Syrian civil war and refugee crisis. In the midst of such turmoil, global citizens demonstrated resilience and a drive towards new forms of protest, social mobilization and appeals to shared imagination. From the prevalence of Star Wars iconography as symbols of resistance in the Women’s Marches in the U.S. to the uses of Avatar in the struggles of indigenous peoples and environmentalist campaigns, we see powerful stories of pop cultural content serving to bridge private and public imaginations in service of social change. In this session the organizers explore the idea of civic imagination as a productive lens through which to explore these and other such examples. This approach grows from our work within the Civic Paths Group at the University of Southern California.

We define civic imagination as the capacity to imagine alternatives to current cultural, social, political, or economic conditions; one cannot change the world unless one can imagine what a better world might look like. Civic imagination also requires the capacity to see one’s self as a civic agent capable of making change, as part of a larger collective which has shared interests, as an equal participant within a democratic culture, and as empathetic to the plight of others different than one’s self. Research on civic imagination represents a space where we can explore the political consequences of cultural representations and the cultural roots of political participation.

We will offer a historical context and theoretical framework to situate our work on civic imagination. We will then share accounts of exploratory creative collaborations with several global communities in which we explored civic imagination from the perspective of personally inspiring stories as material for new, civically engaging narratives and the creation of an Atlas of the Civic Imagination. We will share preliminary findings from a book project on civic imagination. And finally we will describe next steps and research questions as well as suggestions for where there is work that needs to be done.


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay B

3:15pm

Community Based Scholarship: Activism On and Off the Field
Education research sites have begun to use a community approach to conduct their research. Understanding these partnerships between places of learning and activism work together, we need to understand the theories of engaging in communities and research. We aim to organize educators, researchers, and teachers to discuss the methodological, epistemological, and ontological shifts of engaging in community research.

Lew’s talk is about how although there have been studies about the nature of deficit thinking (Valencia 1997), especially among historically marginalized communities, there are much fewer studies that explore community empowerment (Cummins 1986) and resilience models (Rios, Carias, and Bredenoord 2014). We will conceptualize how digital literacy practices enable youth to explore hero narratives in an after-school program and inscribe the world. 

Liu will talk about how one of the greatest moments of disrupting power dynamics in science education is not knowing the scientific answers. Educators believe they need the scientific content knowledge to be able to teach science. We will explore the idea of educators and teachers learning about science alongside with students. 
Godfrey’s talks about how she wrestles with the many identities that came into play during her fieldwork in a middle school classroom and how she negotiated these identities- and differing positions of power - as she tried to balance an authentic alignment with participants' perspectives with the type of objective detachment, so often assumed to be a defining quality of "good research." 

Zinger will be discussing in typical professional development (PD), teachers are often passive recipients of skills, knowledge, or practices that may or may not be useful for them. PD designers and instructors often do not consider the needs and backgrounds of teachers. In this talk we will share what can happen when teacher considerations become central to PD.

Sandoval will be talking about how improvement science has emerged as an approach to educational research. Its commitments—to student- and practitioner-centeredness, networked collaboration, and iteration—are conducive to promoting equity and justice. I will reflect on my identity as an “improvement person” and the contradictions I encounter as a doctoral student at a research university.


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay C

3:15pm

Libraries Ready to Code: Connecting youth to computer science, computational thinking, and community
Increasingly, literacies critical for all children include computer science (CS) and computational thinking (CT). The classroom is the focus of recent large-scale efforts, but learning happens across different spaces in the lives of young people and limitations of classroom learning demand support and alignment from additional community resources. In this spotlight presentation, we are excited to share Libraries Ready to Code (RtC), a joint initiative from the American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy and Google, Inc. The session is organized into three parts:

(1) What does it mean for learning environments to be ready to code? First we will share RtC priority areas and recommendations to help broaden and diversify access to CS learning opportunities, including focus on connected learning, community engagement, and facilitation. This orientation will be illustrated by examples of how US libraries support CS and CT skills acquisition by youth as outlined in the 2016 RtC research report. Research efforts used broad surveys of what is offered across spaces and deep dives with individual libraries to surface innovations and challenges to doing and scaling this work. 

(2) How can existing people and places become ready to code? Next, we will share insights from design work with MLIS faculty to re-envision how to equip pre- and inservice school and public librarians to deliver programs that foster CT skills among the nation’s youth. We will look at how big ideas in the RtC report translate into building capacity through practical preparation. The collaboration explores the role of the educator in environments where there is a shortage of CS expertise, especially for communities that are traditionally underrepresented in CS fields. 

(3) How should we coordinate to move the RtC work forward? Critical action areas of RtC demand connections between and across settings to foster two-way knowledge flow. To enrich our understanding of stakeholders in this work and to broaden the RtC community, we will lastly engage the DML research, design, and practice community in discussion, including how RtC can support, inform, and align with their work, inviting them into the conversation and envisioning next phases of the initiative.


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Pacific Ballroom B

3:15pm

Math instead of chocolate: What German kids really want for Christmas
“Mathe im Advent” is an ‘online advent calendar’ for school kids (www.mathe-im-advent.de). The German Mathematical Society introduced it in 2008, so has been developing for a decade now. With interesting mathematical problems and concepts, it reveals to the students the often-surprising message: Math can be fun and very useful!

For two difficulty levels a new problem is published every day from December 1–24. They come in form of a short and fun story about the elves organizing the “Christmas Gift Business” and every day life in their North Pole village. These stories are immensely popular, each year up to 150,000 German pupils play along [extra-curricular], over 50% of them being female. As a special teaser, the students can participate in a built-in Germany-wide competition and win attractive prices both as single competitors and together with their classes.
The “Mathe im Advent” project aims at school students of all abilities aged 9-15. Our puzzles – together with a detailed answer and the section “The Wider Angle” about the thematic background beyond mathematics – show mathematics as a multi-facetted cultural achievement, a useful toolbox, a way of thinking ahead, and vital basis for decision-making. They are especially designed for fostering students in creative exploring, analyzing, logic reasoning, and problem solving, and through that a confidence in their own abilities. In the long run, we aim to raise general numeracy and digital literacy as well as interest in mathematical careers in science and economy. 

We want to show the characteristics of the competition and the storytelling, then discuss its benefit – on different valuable layers – to the students and the other stakeholders like teachers, parents, education research, and funders. We also want to raise the question if and how this project could be transferred to other countries and cultures like the United States.


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay A

3:15pm

Showcasing Success: Academic Digital Media Work as Scholarship, Creative Expression, Exhibition, and Inspiration
Students are almost constantly making; writing papers, giving presentations, or editing video, they are creating original work. Typically their audience is limited to classmates, or perhaps their grade-wielding instructor. In academia their work may find a wider audience if it is published in a journal or presented at a conference. If it is multimedia work perhaps it will appear on a YouTube or Vimeo channel. But, very often, their goal is to satisfy the requirements of the class, and an additional serendipitous audience gives the work a little, and mostly unanticipated, life outside of the classroom. But what if the goal of the academic assignment was to create scholarship that seeks a wider audience, that exploits the creative side of the student, that is meant to be on display, meant to inspire?

What began as an experiment in 2014 with English and Film Studies Professor Marsha Gordon from North Carolina State University to see how her film studies graduate students - who had never actually done any film production or editing work - would handle an assignment in which they mined hundreds of hours of public domain footage to create a multi-screen installation has turned into regular projects in all of Professor Gordon’s classes. Students are asked to make ambitious public-facing exhibits that are, entertaining and appropriate for a general audience, but which incorporate in-depth research about specific topics (women in film, the films of Thomas Edison, early Hollywood stars), primary source gathering, interlibrary loan usage, scanning, video editing, audio editing, and, of course, textual analysis (amongst other things). Assigning the projects involves creating workshops and seminars to teach the skills needed to complete them, which creates library power users out of engaged students (and which can be used for wider instruction). Their final products become assets that tell the story of how the library is essential for research and creation, and how important faculty and librarian collaboration is to the future of the classroom. This session will explore the challenges, opportunities, and outcomes of positioning the library as a showcase and indispensible resource for multimedia academic work.


Thursday October 5, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Doheny CD

3:45pm

Break
Thursday October 5, 2017 3:45pm - 4:00pm
Pacific Ballroom D

4:00pm

Bringing Making to Rural and Small Libraries: Design Hypotheses for Youth Maker Program Development
Small town libraries are beginning to promote Connected Learning through Maker-oriented programming to encourage youth to participate in hands-on, creative activities such as coding, crafting, multimedia design, etc. However, the design guidelines and models for how libraries serving smaller communities have yet to be specified.

This paper reports on work from a design-based research project that has sought to address that need. In partnership with three middle school libraries and one public community library, we have been designing and co-implementing Maker programs and seeking ways to build on youths’ interests and experiences. Our data sources included extensive naturalistic observations, interviews with librarians, records from our program development activities, and photographic documentation of youth maker activities. 

Thus far, we have been developing and testing multiple design hypotheses for encouraging youth participation in small community and school library Maker-oriented spaces. For instance, one hypothesis has been that encouraging use of the library as a transgressive space where behavioral norms typically expected of youth can be violated supports youth willingness to participate in library-based Maker programming. Indeed, we are observing that among the libraries we have partnered with, those that have programs that allow students to go barefoot, sit on tables, and hide in small corners of the library have consistently higher turnout and surprising moments of creative activity. Another design hypothesis we have proposed relates to the drop-in nature of library programs. Part of the appeal of library Maker programs appears to be that they allow for late arrivals and do not presume prior experience. In recognizing that attendees at small town youth library programs were inconsistent and arrived at different times depending on when they could get a ride, we have found that making explicit beginner pathways visible for such youth to be important to program implementation.

This presentation will share some of these design hypotheses and the programs and materials that have been produced, with the hope that they can inform and promote similar efforts at other libraries in smaller towns and communities in the future.

Speakers

Thursday October 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay B

4:00pm

Computational Thinking in Zoombinis Gameplay
The Logical Journey of the Zoombinis was the first in a series of three award-winning computational thinking games developed in the mid-1990s. In August 2015, TERC and partners re-launched Zoombinis for tablets and desktops for the commercial market. The Educational Gaming Environments (EdGE) group at TERC is studying how playing Zoombinis can help upper elementary and middle school learners build implicit computational thinking (CT) skills (e.g., problem decomposition, pattern recognition, algorithmic thinking, abstraction) that teachers can leverage in formal STEM instruction. Building on prior work with the digital science learning game, Impulse, we will combine video analysis and educational data mining to identify implicit computational thinking that emerges through gameplay (Rowe, Baker, & Asbell-Clarke, 2015). 

This spotlight presentation will report results from the first phase of this process:  developing a human labeling system for evidence of specific CT skills in five Zoombinis puzzle by analyzing video data from a sample of 70+ elementary learners in grades 3-5, middle school learners, and computer scientists. This spotlight presentation will include (1) audience gameplay; (2) discussion of video examples of the types of implicit computational thinking children and computer scientists exhibit through Zoombinis gameplay; and (3) provide an overview of learning analytics methods for combining these human-labeled video data with game log data from these learners and computer scientists to create systematic, automated ways of predicting implicit computational thinking skills from gameplay behaviors in large player audiences.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Rowe

Elizabeth Rowe

Director of Research, EdGE @ TERC


Thursday October 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Pacific Ballroom A

4:00pm

Connected Learning in Popular Media
Scot Osterweil in conversation with Tara Sorensen, Head of Kids Programming at Amazon Studios.

Moderators
avatar for Scot Osterweil

Scot Osterweil

Creative Director, MIT Education Arcade/Gamelab
Scot Osterweil is Creative Director of the Education Arcade in the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program. He has designed award-winning games in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on what is authentically playful in challenging academic subjects. Designs include the acclaimed Zoombinis series (math and logic), Vanished: The MIT/Smithsonian Curated Game(environmental science), Labyrinth (math), Kids Survey Network (data and statistics), Caduceus (medicine), and iCue (history). He is a founder and Creative Director... Read More →

Speakers
TS

Tara Sorensen

Head of Kids, Amazon Studios
Tara was the second television hire at Amazon when she joined in 2012. When she was approached about the role "it felt very experimental," which intrigued her. She equates her early Amazon days to working for a startup. Tara says, “We were tasked with launching pilots in a year without any development on the slate. In my second or third week, the open submission process launched. In summation, it was chaos." Yet, this... Read More →


Thursday October 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay C

4:00pm

Digital Design for Experiential Learning
As interactive media and digital learning experiences become more integrated, instructional design has come to the fore for educators of all stripes. But how do design, interaction, learning, and technology intersect for 21st century classrooms? A good guess is: digital design for experiential learning.

In this talk, we will first examine the relationship between active learning and digital capacity, investigating strengths and weaknesses of face-to-face, blended, and fully online learning in realizing student outcomes. An overview of cognitive psychology and progressive education principles will set the theoretical underpinnings for what experiential learning has historically signified, and what it could extend to mean in the future.

Subsequently, this discussion will be made more concrete through a demo of a blended learning curriculum and accompanying app developed alongside Stanford Graduate School of Education faculty to provide a “digital playground” for rapid, personalized experimentation with new concepts. Student interaction with this online learning environment was book-ended by face-to-face instruction, providing a rich data set with which to inform future pilots around blended learning.

To conclude, we will briefly discuss best practices gathered at the Office of Innovation and Technology thus far around digital design for experiential learning, as well as places to look for use cases around active learning with immersive technologies.

Speakers
SK

Shawn Kim

Digital Learning Strategy Lead, Stanford University


Thursday October 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Pacific Ballroom B

4:00pm

Teaching entrepreneurial and life skills to underserved public school youth through DJing and Music Production
Building Beats is an educational non-profit that provides DJing and digital music production workshops to underserved public school youth in New York City. We employ a team of professional DJs and music producers who help our students develop creative confidence through creating music with computers, tablets, and smartphones. Using exclusively web-based, cloud-based, and mobile software, Building Beats is able to hold workshops in many under-resourced schools and neighborhoods -- all that is required is a computer with an internet connection.

For the spotlight, Building Beats Co-founder/Executive Director Phi Pham will give a presentation on how to use digital music technology to engage young people in music-making. First and foremost, the presentation will include a survey and demonstration of the digital tools we teach with, as well as videos and songs that our students have produced with those tools. It will also cover the positive correlation between making digital music and building broader life skills like time management, self-reliance, and collaboration. Finally, Phi will discuss the impact of Building Beats so far within the communities we are working with, and where we plan to go in the next few years. The goal of the presentation is to give an overview of Building Beats and touch on the fundamental ways in which innovations in music technology are creating new possibilities for youth culture and development.

Speakers

Thursday October 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay A

4:00pm

Varsity eSports:
eSports, or competitive video games, is the biggest media industry most people have never heard of. In 2016, more people watched the League of Legends championship (a team-based fighting game) than the Masters, NBA Finals, World Series, or Stanley Cup Finals. eSports are the sport of choice for millennials. It's predicted that within the next 5 years, more than half of all Universities in the United States and Canada will have recognized, varsity programs (many with scholarships) to play games like Overwatch, League of Legends, Hearthstone, CS: GO and more. High Schools and Middle Schools will follow.

In this Spotlight session, Dr. Chris Haskell from Boise State University will share his extensive research on the current state and future of collegiate and scholastic eSports. Using the mosaic of collected insights and video interviews from the eSports leaders and insiders, Haskell will share what Blizzard, Riot, Twitch, ESPN, TESPA, current college eSports coaches, and university athletic directors have to say about how eSports will change our institutions. The high-energy, media-driven session will bring participants deep into the world of school-based eSports, what to expect, and how to make it happen. There will even be live eSports event using members of the audience to demonstrate and highlight the talents, personalities, and specialities that exist in this sport of the future. For those who want a deeper dive, he will also share a free "How-to" eBook on starting your collegiate or scholastic eSports team.


Thursday October 5, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Emerald Bay DE

4:30pm

Break
Thursday October 5, 2017 4:30pm - 4:45pm
Pacific Ballroom D

4:45pm

Ignite Presentations

Ignite talks are radically different from traditional conference talks. You will be dazzled by humor, wit, energy and inspiration packed into one powerful five-minute talk. 

Ignite Talks will be hosted by Sybil Madison-Boyd.

Speakers:

Ben Miller, The University of Iowa

Chris Haskell, Boise State Univ

Trent Hergenrader, Rochester Institute of Technology

Erin Hoffman-John, Carnegie Mellon University

Juliette Levy, University of California, Irvine

Christina Cantrill, National Writing Project

Brittany DeLacy, California State University, Chico

Seth Hudson, George Mason University

Colby Tofel-Grehl, Utah State University

 



Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Christina Cantrill

Christina Cantrill

Associate Director of National Programs, National Writing Project
avatar for Chris Haskell

Chris Haskell

Clinical Assistant Professor, Boise State University
Serving as a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Technology at Boise State University, Chris is actively piloting and developing groundbreaking alternative approaches to delivering and tracking learning. With co-inventor Dr. Lisa Dawley, Chris created 3D... Read More →
avatar for Trent Hergenrader

Trent Hergenrader

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
My primary area of research is using games and gaming in English courses, and more specifically using role-playing games to teach fiction writing. I am an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology.
EH

Erin Hoffman-John

Assistant Professor, Carnegie Mellon University
SH

Seth Hudson

Assistant Professor - Game Writing, George Mason University
JL

juliette levy

uc riverside
avatar for Ben Miller

Ben Miller

Graduate Student Researcher, The University of Iowa
I love games and digital media that can be used to teach, explore, and refocus children in healthcare settings. | | I am working on my PhD in Educational Psychology and my research interests are focused on investigating how to best utilize frameworks of learning theory and m... Read More →
CT

Colby Tofel-Grehl

Assistant Professor of Science Education, Utah State University


Thursday October 5, 2017 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Pacific Ballroom D

6:00pm

DML2017 Tech Showcase and Opening Reception

Welcome to the 2017 Tech Showcase and Opening Reception. The Tech showcase is festive science fair like event that takes place during our opening reception. We have a terrific line-up of demos, make sure to check them out! *Flyer for download below.

VERITAS: The Gamification of Deception Detection Training

Norah Dunbar, University of California Santa Barbara; Scott Wilson, Javier Elizondo; University of Oklahoma K20 Center

The ability to assess another person’s credibility is one of the foundations of human communication, yet humans are notoriously bad at detecting deception in everyday interactions. To date, most traditional trainings to teach people the correct deception cues have failed and may even cause reactance, which may make people perform worse at detecting deception, than without training. In contrast, digital games can be effective for overcoming resistance to training and in changing people’s decision-making behaviors. Games incorporate both motivating designs and experiential learning environments for people to explore, observe, and reflect upon their behavior. Because people are generally unaware of how inaccurate certain cues can be, deception detection is one area where game-based training can be particularly beneficial in helping people overcome their reliance on incorrect cues, such as stereotypes or “gut” reactions that can be so misleading.

In VERITAS, a student/player takes the role of an interviewer in two distinctive video scenarios—a job interview and a police interrogation. In each scenario, the student/player chooses from a selection of questions and decides on the credibility of the answers to form final judgements to hire or not hire a job applicant, or whether a suspect is guilty or not guilty. Throughout the game there are numerous opportunities for training and evaluation of deception detection. We would like to Showcase VERITAS so that players can try their hand at detecting deception and see if the game will be effective for audiences they are familiar with. We can talk to people about the development of the game and how it came about as people visit our station at the showcase. We can bring up to 10 laptops for multiple players to try the game at a time.

Collaborators:

Will Thompson, Ryan Ralston, Jaise Donovan, Emmett Mathews, Braden Roper; University of Oklahoma K20 Center

DeBug-It! An Electronic Textiles Mat for Iterative Design

Debora Lui, Gayithri Jayathirtha; University of Pennsylvania

The growth of the Maker Movement in educational contexts has highlighted the possibilities of constructing personal projects for learning a wide range of content from circuitry to visual art. Less attention has been paid to the practices of deconstructing tangible projects for the purposes of teaching not only technical but creative skills in making. In this tech showcase, we present Debug-It - a simple learning tool that we have developed allowing for youth to engage with practices of creative construction and deconstruction using soft, fabric-based circuits. Electronic textiles (e-textiles), or the use of sewable electronic components and microcontrollers, has recently been shown to be a unique context for creative and technological expression. Within our prior work, we have seen youth create a range of personal projects from interactive teddy bears to responsive ‘smart’ hoodies. However, the process of making these artifacts often involves tedious and time-consuming procedures such as doing and undoing stitches to debug their projects. Additionally, traditional instruction in electronics often involves ‘hard’ tools such as breadboards, wires, and resistors, which can sometime be alienating to certain students. Debug-It addresses both of these issues in that it allows youth engage with circuitry using more ‘friendly’ materials such as cloth and thread, while also giving experienced e-textiles creators a new tool upon which to quickly iterate their design ideas. During the showcase, we will share the Debug-It tool, illustrating how educators can use the components to introduce students to the practices of rapid prototyping using soft electronic components. We will present different kinds of Debug-It challenges for participants to solve, and also share our experiences using Debug-it with high school students in informal STEAM workshops.

Growing BioSENSORs with BioMakerLab

Orkan Telhan, Yasmin Kafai; University of Pennsylvania

BioMakerLab is a desktop biofabrication tool that streamlines the process of programing organisms with Synthetic Biology. We will use our platform to design, grow, and test a bioSENSOR that can be used to detect water pollution. Our activity will involve three sessions: 1) Brief introduction to the fundamentals of Synthetic Biology; 2) How to make a living sensor using microorganisms; and 3) Growing the bioSENSOR using BioMakerLab. The participants will have a chance to test their designs in a real world application and discuss the broader applications of bioSENSORS in K12 science education, citizen science, and low-cost diagnostics in developing countries. The activity will not require any background knowledge in Biology or BioMaking and intend to address both makers and life science educators. The session will also cover the fundamentals safe handling and disposal of genetically modified organisms.

Piper

Tommy Gibbons, Piper

Today's kids grow up with "black box" phones, computers and gadgets that come in beautiful packages, but leave no room for tinkering or understanding how they work. At Piper, we believe it is critical to understand how technology works in order to make sense of our environment and invent the future. The Piper Computer Kit comes with everything you need to assemble your own computer. Inside, you will also find our revolutionary learning system that teaches kids engineering and programming through a combination of engaging storyline, physical building, and Raspberry Pi Edition of Minecraft.

The kit contains:
● Beautiful, hand­crafted wooden computer case with HD LCD display
● Fully functioning computer running on a Raspberry Pi 3 Project Board. 1GB RAM. 1200 MHz Quad­Core CPU
● Electronic gadgets including LED lights, buzzers, buttons, switches, sensors and more
● Cables to connect the screen, Pi and 6600 mAh powerbank together
● 8 square foot laminated blueprint explaining how to assemble your Piper Computer
● USB mouse with a retractable cable
● An 8GB SD card that holds your game progress and keeps your creations safe
● Custom Raspberry Pi Edition of Minecraft adventure that you experience by building and programming electronic modules
● Wifi enabled, new downloadable levels, and sharing capabilities
● Free automatic level updates
● It even comes with a Piper Screwdriver!

Piper is designed to grow as the child develops, while kids from 8 to 9 enjoy the assembly of the components and building in Raspberry Pi Edition of Minecraft, children from 9 to 13 love programming new gadgets and levels.

Robo Repair

Riva Patel, Feng Rao, Yiheng Zhu; Andrew Carnegie Mellon University

Robo Repair focuses on the rapid practice of addition and subtraction exercises for kindergarten, first, and second grade students. In the app, kids will be able to fix robots by performing math exercises. The app uses touch math to help them with associating numbers with real values. All the exercises are procedurally generated, which helps them with improving their addition and subtraction skills. It can also be used by teachers as part of their lesson plans.

Mind Field

Leona Yang, Rony Kahana, Candice Li, Na-Yeon Kim, Md Tauseef, Christopher Weidya; Andrew Carnegie Mellon University

Mind Field is a web-based interactive experience dealing with racism. It was designed to be a tool that raises awareness and evokes discussion among students on the in-explicit forms of racism. It was created in spring 2017 by the student team including Leona Yang, Rony Kahana, Candice Li, Na-Yeon Kim, Md Tauseef, Christopher Weidya, from Entertainment Technology Center, Carnegie Mellon University. Starting this August, it is officially part of the student orientation in Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University.

Sweet Talk

Andrew O'rourke, Carnegie Mellon University

Team Sweet Talk from Carnegie Mellon University’s Entertainment Technology Center is exploring the use of voice interaction in virtual reality. Given VR’s currently limited interaction options, we explored what novel experiences we could create that would afford deeper character relationships as a result of this unconventional combination of interfaces. Using the natural language power behind both Amazon Echo and Google Home, we tested the limits of character-driven AI by exploring a variety of teaching/learning relationships between our guests and the AI.
...


Thursday October 5, 2017 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Pacific Ballroom C

7:30pm

Student Center on a loop to Hotel Irvine and Duke (2 Shuttles)
Pick-up area is adjacent to the main UCI administration building. Please ask registration desk for directions on how to get there.

Thursday October 5, 2017 7:30pm - 8:00pm
Admin Building (by Flagpole)

8:00pm

Student Center on a loop to Hotel Irvine and Duke (2 Shuttles)
Pick-up area is adjacent to the main UCI administration building. Please ask registration desk for directions on how to get there.

Thursday October 5, 2017 8:00pm - 8:30pm
Admin Building (by Flagpole)
 
Friday, October 6
 

8:00am

Break - Coffee Service
Friday October 6, 2017 8:00am - 8:30am
Pacific Ballroom D

8:00am

Quiet Room + Charging Station
Chill out in peace and quiet! No talking in this room please.

If you need a working space we have Doheny Ballroom A for you to hangout and chat with colleagues.

Friday October 6, 2017 8:00am - 11:30am
Crescent Bay AB

8:00am

Working Space + Charging Station + Luggage Hold
Do you need to catch up with colleagues, feel free to meet up in this space. If you need a quiet space to work, check out Crescent AB instead.

We are also offering an area where you can store your luggage. 

Friday October 6, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Doheny A

8:30am

Hotel Irvine to Student Center (3 Shuttles)
Hotel Irvine pick-ups are located by the loading dock in front of EATS restaurant. Buses will leave promptly. Please make sure to arrive early.

Hotel Irvine Guests: We will only be providing a one-time pick up. If you miss the buses you may need to use Uber/Lyft/taxi to travel to UC Irvine. 

Friday October 6, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Hotel Irvine

8:30am

Duke to Student Center (Taxis)
DML will reserve transportation for you. Taxis will pick-up in the parking lot adjacent to the property. Please make sure to arrive early.

Duke Hotel, Newport Beach  Guests: We will only be providing a one-time pick up. If you miss the buses you may need to use Uber/Lyft/taxi to travel to UC Irvine. 

Friday October 6, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Duke Hotel

9:00am

Building Worlds & Making Meaning Through Games

Building Worlds & Making Meaning Through Games
Provocation: How do we use and design games (analog and digital) that support new literacies?
Discussant: Kurt Squire
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 


Analog Media and Learning: What’s So Special About “Digital?”

Sean Duncan, Indiana University

From Pokemon to STEM Game Gased Learning: Anatomy of a Crowdsourced Trading Card Game
David Ng, University of British Columbia

Game Changers: Making New Meanings and New Media with Videogames
Catherine Burwell, University of Calgary

MarsU: A Game to Teach Introductory Stats Concepts to Deaf and Hearing Students
David Simkins, Rochester Institute of Technology

Collaborative Worldbuilding in the Classroom
Trent Hergenrader, Rochester Institute of Technology

Dig Deeper: A Unity-based Biblical Archaeology Game
Emily Johnson, University of Central Florida

Math instead of chocolate –What German kids really want for Christmas
Robert Wistenfeld, Mathe im Leben gGmbH





Moderators
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

full professor, uw-madison

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Burwell

Catherine Burwell

Associate Professor, University of Calgary
My current research project focuses on young creators' impressions and experiences of copyright. I'm also interested in youth media production, digital remix, teacher education, and critical and media literacies.
SD

Sean Duncan

University of Virginia
avatar for Trent Hergenrader

Trent Hergenrader

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
My primary area of research is using games and gaming in English courses, and more specifically using role-playing games to teach fiction writing. I am an Assistant Professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology.
EJ

Emily Johnson

Postdoc, Games Research Lab, University of Central Florida
avatar for David Ng

David Ng

Faculty, Michael Smith Laboratories, University of British Columbia
David Ng is a geneticist, science educator, and faculty based at the UBC Michael Smith Laboratories.  Of note: (1) he is partly responsible for the massive DNA helix emblazoned on his building’s facade; (2) his Dad beat up Bruce Lee; (3) his first foray into general publishing... Read More →
avatar for David Simkins

David Simkins

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
David is fascinated by the potential of games, particularly role playing as a tool for facilitating and encouraging learning. He is also fascinated by the constraints and affordances of different games as tools for learning. Fortunately, he is ale to study games, write about game... Read More →



Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay DE

9:00am

Designing With (not just for) Learners

Designing With (not just for) Learners
Provocation: What can we learn by introducing learners to design thinking and inviting them to become co-researchers in our design projects?
Discussant: Katie Salen
Abstracts: Are available here and attached as a resource file below.

Scratch Memories: Using Personalized Data Visualization to Design Reflective Experiences for Young Creators
Shruti Dhariwal, Graduate Student, MIT Media Lab

Genius Hour: A Pathway to Connected Learning in Traditional Public Schools?
David Quinn, Mendon-Upton Regional School District (Massachusetts) / The University of Rhode Island

Scratch Microworlds: Designing Project-Based (Rather than Puzzle-Based) Introductions to Coding
Moran Tsur, MIT Media Lab

Centering Teens As Authorities for Understanding Youth Social Media Use
Rachel Magee, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Multidisciplinary New Media Design Undergraduate Program
Hye-Jin Nae, Rochester Institute of Technology

What’s Literacy Got to Do With It? Youth Literacy Practices in a Computer Coding Club
Earl Aguilera, Arizona State University




Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Earl Aguilera

Earl Aguilera

Graduate Research Assistant, Center for Games and Impact, Arizona State University
Former HS English teacher | Doctoral candidate: Learning, Literacies, and Technologies | Studying the role of youth literacies in digital-age learning environments
avatar for Shruti Dhariwal

Shruti Dhariwal

Grad Student, MIT Media Lab
HN

Hye-Jin Nae

Assistant Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology
DQ

David Quinn

Director of Technology Integration, Mendon-Upton Regional School District
Dave Quinn is the Director of Technology Integration for the Mendon-Upton Regional School District. He is also a Ph.D. candidate in the University of Rhode Island / Rhode Island College Ph.D. in Education program and is researching teacher practices that utilize technology to su... Read More →
avatar for Moran Tsur

Moran Tsur

Grad Student, Scratch Team



Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Doheny B

9:00am

Principles and Practices of Making Inside and Outside Schools
Principles and Practices of Making Inside and Outside Schools 
Provocation: How does a make/maker framework support learning?
Discussant: Deborah Fields
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 

Connected Youth-Adult Partnerships in Informal Environments
Ericka Brunson, Kitsap Regional Library
Megan Burton, Kitsap Regional Library

Implementing Culturally-Centered Robotics Programs Through Library Partnerships
Jiéyì Ludden, Seattle Public Library 

Designs for Digital Making: How Programmatic Forms Impact Constructionist Learning
Emily Schindler, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Making with Biology: How to Grow Socially Responsive and Creative Designs with bioMAKERlab
Debora Lui, University of Pennsylvania 

If These Walls Could Breathe: The Literacies of Making a “Living Wall”in High School
Molly Buckley-Marudas, Cleveland State University 

Humanities Fabrication: The Wisconsin History Maker Kit
Mitchell Ogden, University of Wisconsin - Stout 

Moderators
DF

Deborah Fields

Assistant Professor, Utah State University
Dr. Deborah A. Fields is a Temporary Assistant Professor in Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University and an independent research consultant. Deborah researches children’s connective learning and identity engagement through designing with digital t... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ericka Brunson

Ericka Brunson

Librarian, Kitsap Regional Library
avatar for Molly Buckley-Marudas

Molly Buckley-Marudas

Assistant Professor, Cleveland State University
avatar for Megan Burton

Megan Burton

Librarian, Kitsap Regional Library
Megan Burton is a Teen Services Librarian at the Kitsap Regional Library system in Bremerton, Washington. She is committed to designing for and with young people in active learning spaces that celebrate diversity, equity, digital media, and most importantly youth voice. Megan c... Read More →
JL

Jieyi Ludden

Robot Backpacks and Family Learning Associate, Seattle Public Library
MO

Mitchell Ogden

Associate Professort, University of Wisconsin-Stout
avatar for Emily Schindler

Emily Schindler

University of Wisconsin-Madison



Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Pacific Ballroom A

9:00am

Creativity and Connectivity: Exploring Issues of Identity, Community and Voice with Scratch
Through television, podcasts, and the many other forms of media that pervade the digital landscape, young people constantly consume information. Because of the role media plays in shaping the thoughts, aspirations, and actions of young people, access to critical media literacies and supportive learning networks can help young people analyze mainstream narratives, which can be a source of disempowerment—especially for non-dominant youth. However, in today’s highly networked world, young people need to become critical creators as well as consumers, and supporting young people’s senses of trust and connectedness is essential to this task.

In this teach-in, we share lessons learned from the Cambridge Creative Citizens Project, a participatory action research project that engaged teens in a summer-long media production and “artivism” experience to explore issues of identity, community, and voice, using Scratch. We will also engage participants in creating and/or analyzing a media artifact related to an issue that is personally meaningful (such as family history, fake news, or immigration). This design experience will be used to ground discussion of ways to develop and support computational fluency through empowering design-based learning experiences in schools and informal learning environments, particularly for non-dominant youth. Participants need no prior programming experience and all are welcome to attend.

This teach-in will be facilitated by members of the Creative Computing Lab, based at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and we will engage participants in creative production activities, using the Scratch programming language and online creative learning community. Our approach to supporting young people’s media empowerment draws from the communities of practice and connected learning frameworks. From these perspectives, learning and identity can be understood to be mutually constituted, and connected communities enable processes of identity and worldmaking as steps towards broader forms of empowerment.

Speakers
RJ

Raquel Jimenez

Ph.D. student, Harvard Graduate School of Education


Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay B

9:00am

Fork Your Syllabus, You Slacker! Using GitHub and Slack to Collaborate with Students (and Colleagues)
Have you ever wanted to share materials from your classes with other faculty, but found that your courseware made that nearly impossible? Or wanted a way to easily share your updates and modifications to someone else’s materials? Do you struggle to get students to respond to email? Do you wish you had better options for engaging with students working in groups without being overbearing? 

In this session, I'll show you how you can use GitHub to make your course materials easily accessible, updatable, and shareable—even if they have nothing to do with programming! You’ll learn the basics of how GitHub works, and how to take advantage of their free classroom and student accounts to create private as well as public repositories of content. I’ll also show you how you can use the free version of Slack to create classroom conversation spaces that support class-wide announcements, group conversations for project work, private messaging with students, and easy file sharing. 

While you’ll learn a lot about using these tools just by attending, listening, and later referring to the materials I’ll post online (using GitHub, of course!), you’ll get the most out of the session if you bring your own laptop. No need to install any software in advance—we’ll be working only with the web-based interface to both tools.

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Lawley

Elizabeth Lawley

Professor, Rochester Institute of Technology


Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Woods ABC

9:00am

GeoConvos: Exploring Tools and Methods for Evaluating and Reflecting on Connected Learning Pathways
In this Teach-In session, the GeoConvos team (Chicago-area educators, researchers, and youth program providers) will engage session participants in technologies, tools, and methods we have designed and piloted with youth and adults for evaluating and reflecting on connected learning and engagement “on the move” in our everyday lives.

We call this set of digital and non-digital activities, methods, and tools GeoConvos (geoconvos.org), which is derived from the movement-oriented and place-based nature of the activities (geo) and the ways in which the activities are built on dialogue and reflective conversation (convos). We have designed the activities as we have considered ways to support youth and adults in formal and informal educational settings in evaluating and reflecting on connected learning. We have intentionally focused our efforts towards supporting equitable opportunities to learn for all participants and towards recognizing learning opportunities and experiences that are not always validated in evaluations of learning.

We have previously shared GeoConvos with museum employees, youth in out-of-school programs, and adults from the Hive Chicago Learning Network. In each setting, participants were engaged by the activities and interested to reflect on their own learning and to consider how their individual histories led them to their current work and areas of interest. The activities have also prompted participants to consider future learning pathways. We are excited about the opportunity to share GeoConvos with the DML community.

Some activities we could share in the workshop include: 1) individually annotating paper maps to consider daily learning pathways; 2) creating a photosphere (an immersive photograph similar to photos of places available on Google Street View) of a memorable/engaging place; 3) reflecting on the interactions of our memories and our digital devices using images captured on our personal mobile devices Each of these activities includes a reflective component that supports critically considering one’s own learning pathways while also building capacity with technologies.

Session overview: After a brief overview of the project, session participants will interact and engage in a selection of GeoConvos activities, review a facilitator guide, consider case studies, and discuss how GeoConvos activities can be integrated into practice.

Speakers
IB

Ilana Bruton

Public Programs Manager, Chicago History Museum
avatar for Virginia Killian Lund

Virginia Killian Lund

Research Assistant, University of Illinois-Chicago
I'm interested in young people's composing processes with media, and with the communities and practices that support their work.
AS

Ani Schmidt

Public Programs Coordinator, Chicago History Museum


Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay A

9:00am

Preparing Teachers for Connected Learning
Preparing Teachers for Connected Learning

Panel Abstract 

While connected learning has its roots in informal learning in children’s and teens’ out-of-school spaces, there is a growing interest among teacher educators in the potential for connected learning to serve as a framework for developing learning experiences that enhance pre-service teachers’ agency around their own learning. At the same time, connected learning has the potential to transform teacher learning and professional development (Garcia et al., 2014; Smith et al., 2016). The connected learning framework’s three spheres of learning - peer supported, interest powered (student-designed), and academically oriented (Ito et al., 2013) - are powerful design elements when put to use with teachers. Connected learning environments such as CLMOOC, for example, position teachers as “designer[s]-in-context” (Garcia et al., 2014, p. 5) who collaboratively co-design classroom instruction, equitable and motivating learning environments for students, and their own professional learning. 

This panel highlights research on teaching and learning through and with connected learning in a variety of contexts related to teacher preparation, including pre-service teacher education, faculty professional development, and in-service professional learning. The projects offer insights into the ways in which the connected learning framework can be applied in practice, as well as point to challenges for applying the existing connected learning framework within the context of higher education. Taken together, these presentations provide a snapshot of the current research around connected learning and teacher preparation, and point to implications for future research, theory development, and practice.

Presenters and Presentation Titles 

Pre-service Teacher Experiences in the Connected Technology Education Classroom
Sarah Lohnes Watulak (Towson)

What does “Participation” Mean in a Connected Learning Classroom? Translating Theory into Practice in an Openly-networked Teacher Education Course
Kira Baker-Doyle (Arcadia), Latricia Whitfield (Arcadia), Katie Miller (Arcadia)

From Connected Learning to Connected Teaching: Toward a New Model of Digital Literacy Teacher Education
Nicole Mirra (Rutgers)

Connected Learning in Higher Education through Professional Learning Networks
Torrey Trust (UMass Amherst), Jeffrey Carpenter (Elon), Daniel Krutka (Texas Woman’s U.)

When Open is not Enough: Participatory Design for Connected Learning
Anna Smith (Illinois State), Christina Cantrill (NWP), Mia Zamora (Kean), Stephanie West-Puckett (East Carolina U)

References

Garcia, A. (2014). Introduction: Teacher agency and connected learning. In A. Garcia (Ed.), Teaching in the Connected Learning Classroom (pp. 6-9). Irvine, CA: Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. 

Ito, M., Gutierrez, K., Livingstone, S., Penuel, B., Rhodes, J., Salen, K., Schor, J., Sefton-Green, J., & Watkins, S. C. (2013). Connected learning: An agenda for research and design. Irvine, CA: Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. 

Smith, A., West-Puckett, S., Cantrill, C., & Zamora, M. (2016). Remix as professional learning: Educators’ iterative literacy practice in CLMOOC. Education Sciences, 6, 1-12. doi:10.3390/educsci6010012

Speakers
avatar for Kira Baker-Doyle

Kira Baker-Doyle

Associate Professor of Education, Arcadia University
avatar for NIcole Mirra

NIcole Mirra

Assistant Professor of Teacher Education, Rutgers University
Nicole is a proud former NYCUDL debate coach and English teacher who is now a teacher educator at Rutgers University. Her teaching and research focuses on the intersections between critical literacy and civic engagement in classroom, grassroots, and digital spaces. Debate has sha... Read More →
avatar for Torrey Trust

Torrey Trust

Assistant Professor of Learning Technology, University of Massachusetts Amherst
My research focuses on how teachers use technology to enhance their own learning as well as their classroom practice. I am also interested in instructional design, 3D printing, makerspaces, and social media.
avatar for Sarah C. Lohnes Watulak

Sarah C. Lohnes Watulak

Associate Professor, Towson University
I'm interested in the possibilities for connected learning as a framework for the design of rich, technology supported learning in pre-service technology education courses.


Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Doheny CD

9:00am

Table Top Movie Making in Teacher Education and Beyond
This workshop will demonstrate possibilities for educating preservice and inservice teachers about integrating participatory practices across the school curriculum. As Nicole Mirra (2015a, 2015b, 2015c, 2016) has beautifully documented in her series of DML blog posts on developing teacher education coursework around multimodal literacies, we are only beginning to explore how to create teacher professional development around “strong, technology-enriched pedagogy” within schools.

Specifically, we’ll engage participants in a cycle of “Tabletop Movie Making” in which we introduce the basics of video making and the vocabulary of film. As Huerta (2015) writes, the collaboration, problem solving, critical thinking and “pitching” of filmmaking in classrooms is distinctly meta-cognitive work for all students, especially those with special needs.

We will use iPads, miniature diorama set construction, puppet-like character creation, and script development in a series of “build/make/ break” exercises. Small groups will each produce a short video incorporating a range of shots, editing techniques, and voice-over audio recording. Participants will pass through the 5 active verbs of the method: write, build, shoot, edit and share. 

The presenters have teamed to offer these rapid-iterative, collaborative, and creative sessions across preservice and inservice teacher education courses on one university campus. One presenter has also done multiple Tabletop Movie Making workshops across school and community settings. Dreamworks animation used these methods for internal professional development with staff. He has also trained over 500 Los Angeles teachers to bring video work into the classroom in partnership with Los Angeles County Museum of Art Art + Film Institute (which has adopted Tabletop MovieMaking as their core method for educator workshops). 

In the 90 minutes, we will provide context of the “why” of film-making in K-12 schools and in teacher education, produce the videos through a progression of exercises, screen the videos, and then reflect and discuss together the integration of these methods across the curriculum.

We will provide iPads, all “analog” materials for set and character construction, and other equipment.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Van Galen

Jane Van Galen

Professor, University of Washington Bothell
Participatory media and connected learning in education and teacher education, first generation students, digital storytelling.


Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Emerald Bay C

9:00am

Using Universal Design Learning and Game Design to Develop Game-Based Curricula
This teach-in will explore the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework and how it applies to education. It will use game design concepts mapped to that framework to produce innovative classroom curricula for youth which make use of digital games. Dr. Gabrielle Rappolt-Schlichtmann Executive Director of EdTogether and former Director of Learning Science at CAST (developer of the UDL framework), joins Ludic Learning’s Paul Darvasi, a high school teacher who incorporates games in his classes; and Heidi McDonald, award-winning game designer and Creative Director for iThrive Games. The trio will help educators understand the importance and recommendations of the UDL framework, and demonstrate the ways that the inherent systems and features of digital games naturally express this mode. A series of case studies will be presented to provide tangible examples of how these concepts can be applied to educational practices with youth. Participants will then work in pairs to identify a specific teachable concept, and map out how they might use the UDL framework and its corresponding game attributes to arrive at a game-based teaching method for that particular concept. This teach-in will ideally help hesitant or inexperienced educators gain the knowledge and confidence to adopt games and game design principles.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi McDonald

Heidi McDonald

Senior Creative Director, iThrive Games
iThrive is a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting positive psychology practices in teens using the power of games. We fund new games, efficacy test new and existing games, and are producing resource materials for game developers who want to put positive psychology concep... Read More →


Friday October 6, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Pacific Ballroom B

10:30am

Break - Coffee and Snacks
Friday October 6, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Pacific Ballroom D

11:00am

Do We Still Believe That Networked Youth Can Change the World?

For more than a decade, Esra'a Al Shafei has worked as a blogger, a civil rights advocate, and youth leader using networked communications to build platforms which deployed new media tools to amplify the voices of oppressed and underrepresented groups in the Middle East. Henry Jenkins has headed the Media, Activism, and Participatory Politics Research group which has sought to better understand the political lives of American youth, who are seeking to change the world "by any media necessary." In this conversation, they will compare notes, reflecting on what we know now that we did not know a decade ago, after the Arab Spring, after Occupy, after #blacklivesmatter, and after Trump, about the ways young people may or may not be able to use social media to bring about social change.


Esra'a Al-Shafei
is a Bahraini civil rights activist, blogger, and the founder and executive director of Mideast Youth and its related projects, including CrowdVoice.org. Al-Shafei is a senior TED Fellow,an Echoing Green fellow, and has been referred to by CNN reporter George Webster as "An outspoken defender of free speech".[5] She has been featured in FastCompany as one of the "100 Most Creative People in Business."In 2011, The Daily Beast listed Al-Shafei as one of the 17 bravest bloggers worldwide. She is also a promoter of music as a means of social change, and founded Mideast Tunes, which is currently the largest platform for underground musicians in the Middle East and North Africa.

Al-Shafei is a recipient of the Berkman Award for Internet Innovation from Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School in 2008 for "outstanding contributions to the internet and its impact on society." In 2012, she received a Shuttleworth Foundation Fellowship for her work on the open source platform CrowdVoice.org. She is also the recipient of the Monaco Media Prize, which acknowledges innovative uses of media for the betterment of humanity. In 2014, she was featured in Forbes' "30 Under 30" list of social entrepreneurs making an impact in the world. The World Economic Forum listed her as one of "15 Women Changing the World in 2015."


Henry Jenkins
 is the Provost’s Professor of Communication, Journalism, and Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California. He arrived at USC in Fall 2009 after spending the past decade as the Director of the MIT Comparative Media Studies Program and the Peter de Florez Professor of Humanities. He is the author and/or editor of twelve books on various aspects of media and popular culture, including Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory CultureHop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Cultureand From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games. His newest books include Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide and Fans, Bloggers and Gamers: Exploring Participatory Culture. He is currently co-authoring a book on“spreadable media” with Sam Ford and Joshua Green. He has written for Technology ReviewComputer GamesSalon, and The Huffington Post.

Jenkins is the principal investigator for Project New Media Literacies (NML), a group which originated as part of the MacArthur Digital Media and Learning Initiative. Jenkins wrote a white paper on learning in a participatory culture that has become the springboard for the group’s efforts to develop and test educational materials focused on preparing students for engagement with the new media landscape. He also continues to be actively involved with the Convergence Culture Consortium, a faculty network which seeks to build bridges between academic researchers and the media industry in order to help inform the rethinking of consumer relations in an age of participatory culture. And he is working at USC to develop a new research project focused on young people, participatory culture, and public engagement.

While at MIT, he was one of the principal investigators for The Education Arcade, a consortium of educators and business leaders working to promote the educational use of computer and video games. Jenkins also plays a significant role as a public advocate for fans, gamers and bloggers: testifying before the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee investigation into “Marketing Violence to Youth” following the Columbine shootings; advocating for media literacy education before the Federal Communications Commission; calling for a more consumer-oriented approach to intellectual property at a closed door meeting of the governing body of the World Economic Forum; signing amicus briefs in opposition to games censorship; and regularly speaking to the press and other media about aspects of media change and popular culture. Jenkins has a B.A. in Political Science and Journalism from Georgia State University, a M.A. in Communication Studies from the University of Iowa and a PhD in Communication Arts from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 



Moderators
HJ

Henry Jenkins

Professor, University of Southern California

Speakers

Friday October 6, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Pacific Ballroom D

12:30pm

Lunch - On your Own
On your own! Explore great eats around UC Irvine.

Friday October 6, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
TBA

2:00pm

Beyond Just Content: Learning Games that Empower Teens to Cultivate Positive Habits
Effective learning games don’t “trick” students into engaging with content, they provide students with meaningful experiences that empower them to expand and develop their mindsets, relationships, and skills. Digital gameplay has the potential to empower teens to cultivate not just knowledge, but also social and emotional skills that are critical for positive development. Practicing positive habits like cooperation, empathy, gratitude, and curiosity can cultivate those skills, and embedding these positive practices into gameplay offers a tremendous opportunity to meet teens where they are and where they want to be. In this panel, award-winning designers of learning games present their unique approaches to creating meaningful in-game experiences that empower teens to not only learn subject matter but also develop strengths that can be transferred to their daily lives. Doris Rusch of DePaul University discusses how she leverages the power of embodied learning in games to boost empathy for the lived experience of conditions like depression (“Elude”), addiction (“Akrasia”), and anxiety (“Soteria: Dreams As Currency”). John Krajewski, founder and CEO of Strange Loop Games, discusses, among other titles, his ambitious social sim, “Eco,” a game that invites students to draw on and refine their ability to cooperate, lead, negotiate, and solve conflicts as a classroom community with the goal of saving their shared game world. Barbara Chamberlin from the Learning Games Lab at New Mexico State University discusses her approach to user-centered design and iterative testing to create engaging STEM and life-skills digital learning experiences (like “Night of the Living Debt,” a zombie-themed game on credit score). Panelists will share their experiences, strategies, and design tips to address critical questions like: How do games serve as a meaningful anchor for deep learning in classroom settings? What supports need to surround gameplay to ensure that skill development is taking place? How do game developers collaborate with educators to use digital games to their fullest capacity in sometimes technophobic educational settings? Susan Rivers from iThrive Games will moderate. iThrive Games collaborates with game developers to design evidence-based, engaging games that provide opportunities for teens to adopt positive psychology habits that help them thrive.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Chamberlin

Barbara Chamberlin

Prefessor, New Mexico State University
Barbara Chamberlin directs game and media development at New Mexico State University’s Learning Games Lab. The production team works on a variety of content and audiences, most recently completing Math Snacks games for mid school learners (mathsnacks.org). Dr. Chamberlin also c... Read More →


Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Woods ABC

2:00pm

Challenging Cultural Inequities via Media Engagement and Near-Peer Mentorship
This panel presents research from three different yet related youth media projects designed to challenge cultural and structural inequities. Each project identifies and discusses the benefits and challenges of pairing youth with college students as near-peer mentors within the context of media and technology engagement. 

#1: Gender inequity in technology spaces persists: women hold 12% of engineering jobs and 40% of women with technology degrees leave the profession. Seeds of Change is a leadership-training program for high school and college women in technology. Participants learn foundational frameworks to recognize gendered dynamics and strategies to navigate tech environments where their participation is affected. A key curricular framework is the Train the Trainer model: Stanford technology undergraduates receive feminist training and impart this knowledge to high school students interested in media and technology majors and careers. This model empowers women to be leaders and provides high school students with relatable mentoring relationships.

#2: Despite available statewide funding, only 4% of former foster youth in Texas graduate from college. As a way to lower some of the barriers, UNT hosted a summer digital storytelling workshop that paired teens in foster care with college students majoring in media arts. The workshop taught teens basic media production skills as an avenue for sharing their own stories with peers, caretakers, and CPS. The teens reported that the experience was personally empowering and rewarding. The mentorship aspect helped to challenge misconceptions teens in care had about college as an institution and as an opportunity.

#3: The "Making Movies that Matter" Film Festival places former CalArts students in 30 LAUSD schools to teach youth how to use smartphones to make short films about something that ‘matters’ to them. The content of the films generated deeper insights into how participants perceive today’s political, social and environmental landscape. Pairing youth from communities that typically do not support the arts as a career option with students from an elite art school generated a significant need to understand how mentor/mentee relationships can cross political, class, and cultural boundaries.

Together this panel presents original research that lends a deeper understanding to the role of near-peer mentorship within youth media and technology curricula.


Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay C

2:00pm

Connected Learning Principles in Practice

Connected Learning Principles in Practice
Principles: How are educators using connected learning principles in research and practice
Discussant: Vera Michalchik
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 

Turning our Connected Learning Gaze on a Single Learner: To What Ends?
Jayne C. Lammers, University of Rochester

A School Garden that Connects Plants, Soil, and Beyond
Steven Zuiker, Arizona State University

Tinkering with Toys and Tools
Priyanka Parekh, Arizona State University

Digitally-Mediated Black Activism on College Campuses: Contexts for Racial and Political Identity Development
Kihana Ross, The University of Texas, Austin
Sepehr Vakil, The University of Texas, Austin
Na’ilah Nasir, The University of Texas, Austin





Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Jayne C. Lammers

Jayne C. Lammers

Associate Professor, University of Rochester
affinity space research; online research methods; videogame and other digital literacies; writing; 21st century learning; adolescent literacies; English teacher preparation
PP

Priyanka Parekh

Research Assistant, Arizona State University
SV

Sepehr Vakil

Assistant Professor, UT Austin
avatar for Steven Zuiker

Steven Zuiker

Assistant Professor, Arizona State University
My work considers the design of interactive learning environments such as educational videogames and how these designs can better inform our understanding of the general consequences of learning. In contrast to a conventional view of knowledge transfer, I enlist the idea of learn... Read More →



Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pacific Ballroom B

2:00pm

Cultivating Computational Thinking: Developing Computational Identities Through Scratch and Apps

Cultivating Computational Thinking: Developing Computational Identities Through Scratch and Apps
Provocation: How do we increase youth participation and inquiry in coding literacies? What identities are youth afforded by participation in Scratch and App development?
Discussant: Victor Lee
Abstracts: Are available here and are attached as a resource file below. 


Engaging Children in Creating, Thinking, and Learning with Data

Sayamindu Dasgupta, University of Washington

Gender Differences in Patterns of Project Sharing on the Scratch Online Programming Community
Emilia Gan, University of Washington

Supporting Youth in Harnessing their Interest in Computer Coding to Envision Careers in ComputerScience
Crystle Martin, Digital Media and Learning Hub

Empowering Youth Through Mobile Computing with MIT App Inventor
Mike Tissenbaum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology




Moderators
VL

Victor Lee

Associate Professor, Utah State University

Speakers
SD

Sayamindu Dasgupta

Postdoctoral fellow, University of Washington
avatar for Emilia Gan

Emilia Gan

Graduate Student, University of Washington, Paul G Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering
Emilia Gan is a second year student in the Paul G Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, Seattle. Her current research examines gender differences in participation on online programming platforms. Feel free to chat with her about 1) Teachi... Read More →
avatar for Crystle Martin

Crystle Martin

Researcher, University of California, Irvine
MT

Mike Tissenbaum

Research Scientist, MIT



Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Doheny B

2:00pm

Layered Learning: Web Annotation in Collaborative and Connected Contexts
This panel brings together educators, researchers, and technologists to explore the intersection of web annotation and learning. Web annotation draws upon the centuries-old practice of adding marginalia to books, and extends this layer as a feature of the web allowing commentary, highlights, embedded media, and content categorization. Among web annotation technologies, the open platform Hypothesis (https://hypothes.is) distinctively supports learning, research, and collaborative knowledge production.

Sharing narratives and findings from initiatives using Hypothesis, seven panelists representing five projects will address the question: How do the open, social, and collaborative affordances of web annotation inform learning and community-building?

Hypothesis Education (https://hypothes.is/education/): Hypothesis Director of Education Jeremy Dean will establish context about the emerging role of web annotation in formal education and interest-driven learning; introduce web annotation and the Hypothesis platform; and suggest outstanding questions and learning opportunities.

Networked Narratives (http://netnarr.arganee.world): Mia Zamora and Alan Levine will share how learners in Networked Narratives - a digital storytelling and civic imagination connected course for Kean University students and open participants - leveraged annotation to explore virtual trips and narrative layers atop web content.

OER Textbooks (https://press.rebus.community/opensem/): Robin DeRosa will discuss a connected learning curriculum at Plymouth State University, highlighting how annotation activities support college students’ interdisciplinary learning when Hypothesis is integrated into open education resources (OER) via student-created textbooks.

Marginal Syllabus (http://marginalsyllab.us): Reporting on the Marginal Syllabus, an effort that convenes conversations about equity in learning via monthly annotathons, Remi Kalir will focus on a partnership with the National Writing Project’s Educator Innovator that supports openly networked professional learning via annotation.

Open Learning ‘17 (http://openlearninghub.net): Gardner Campbell will detail annotation activities incorporated into Virginia Commonwealth University’s Open Learning cMOOC - an “innovation hub” associated with the AAC&U Faculty Collaboratives initiative - highlighting annotated course texts about open learning and participatory culture.

Attendees will also be invited to annotate a webpage featuring descriptions of the panelists’ projects and research; these annotations will help guide interaction prior to and following the panel. The panel will conclude with discussion as directed by attendee questions.

Speakers
GC

Gardner Campbell

Special Assistant to the Provost and Associate Professor of English, Virginia Commonwealth University
RK

Remi Kalir

Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver


Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay DE

2:00pm

Library Film Education: On and Beyond the Screen
When it comes to film programming in libraries, the days of “hit play and walk away” are over. Today, more and more individuals have the tools for film and media production literally in the palms of their hands, and quality independent, international, and documentary films are becoming easier to access. Librarians are active in the digital revolution and part of this work includes bringing robust and meaningful film programming and hands-on digital media education into school and public libraries. How? This presentation shows how, through film and media education partnerships in their communities and by deepening their own professional development experiences in critically analyzing and creating media, librarians are advancing the digital and media literacy competencies of their patrons. 

In this session, we document the work of Media Smart Libraries, an IMLS-funded statewide professional development initiative for librarians in Rhode Island. We outline how our deep partnership with the Providence Children's Film Festival developed and how we exploited the assets of a university - community partnership to increase awareness of the value of digital and media literacy for children, teens, and families. By advancing the digital and media literacy competencies of children, teens, and families in our communities, we helped increase awareness of the value of screen media education and digital and media literacy for children, teens, families, and community leaders. We created a cadre of digital and media literacy expert librarians and improved the quality of LIS education for the next generation of public and school librarians through coursework that offers hands-on experiential learning and competencies in content creation, curation, and collaboration. But this work was not easy and there was a lot of learning along the way. We describe the design, implementation and assessment of a series of public programming events over the course of two years emphasizing the use of film and media texts, and digital media tools and technologies, drawing upon our partnership with the Providence Children’s Film Festival. We offered a series of 15+ Continuing Education Workshops for librarians designed to create a cadre of digital and media literacy experts. We describe our learning experience using a cohort program and a digital badging system to credential librarians who attend workshops/events and complete activities towards the earning of badges. Finally, we describe the consequences of revising the University of Rhode Island's MLIS curriculum to emphasize digital media literacy and experiential learning through community collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Liz Deslauriers

Liz Deslauriers

Media Education Lab
PS

Pamela Steager

Senior Writer/Researcher, Media Education Lab


Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Pacific Ballroom A

2:00pm

Researching Intergenerational Learning In and Around Games
Research on learning, especially connected learning, increasingly examines meaningful activities across the many contexts of young people’s lives at school, at home or in their social lives. As part of this ongoing shift, intergenerational, family and adult-child learning with digital media has been given increased attention. Well-designed games have been seen as a powerful medium for connected learning, but areas of inquiry continue to emerge on intergenerational learning around gaming.

This panel builds upon the ongoing dialogue about research into intergenerational gaming and learning. Across three research projects, it looks at how we study and design intergenerational gameplay in informal learning settings like homes and museums. It features presentation and discussion of three studies that frame family activities around gameplay at varying layers and timescales. These framings range from a broader and longer-term view of family learning and development processes around gaming, to short, fine-grained examination of collaborative family reasoning around gameplay on an interactive tabletop.

First, Elisabeth Gee and Sinem Siyahhan present three different frameworks for understanding intergenerational gaming and learning, and each brings different issues related to learning and gaming into focus. Second, Siyahhan and Gee present cases of families learning together through playing Minecraft in designed out of school contexts, focusing on the reversal of the teacher and student roles between parents and children and the opportunities and challenges around such learning arrangement. Third, DeVane and collaborators present their research on the collaborative physics problem-solving talk of parent-child dyads that are playing a skatepark-design game prototype created by the researchers for an interactive tabletop platform in a children’s museum exhibit.

Presentation 1 - Understanding Video Gaming and Learning in Family Contexts
Gee and Siyahhan 

Presentation 2 - Families@Play: How Minecraft Support Family Learning and Togetherness - Siyahhan and Gee

Presentation 3 - Families and Frontside Physics: Collaborative adult-child talk during in-game skatepark design - DeVane, Miller, Dietmeier, Missall, Nanda

Discussant: Kurt SquireOrganizer/Collaborator #1

Speakers
JD

Jeremy Dietmeier

University of Iowa
avatar for Elisabeth Gee

Elisabeth Gee

Professor, Arizona State University
I'm the Associate Director of the Center for Games & Impact at ASU, and co-directing the Play2Connect initiative with Dr. Sinem Siyahhan at Cal State-San Marcos. I'm interested in gender and gaming, game-based affinity spaces, and intergenerational play.
avatar for Kurt Squire

Kurt Squire

full professor, uw-madison


Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay B

2:00pm

Self-Making: How Youth and Educators Construct an Evolving Sense of Identity in Online Platforms
Many people often think of online platforms as a means of communicating, connecting, and sharing. In this panel we will explore multiple perspectives on the use of online sharing platforms (Scratch and Tumblr) by young people and by teachers as a means of reflecting on issues of development and identity. 

Claire Fontaine will discuss a case from her study of how working class young women use online sharing platforms in projects of self-making, as they document the self, reflect on the documented self, and make claims for its intrinsic value and worth, crafting counter-narratives to a postfeminist media environment. She argues that the dominant framing within educational policy and practice of digital media literacy insufficiently captures young people’s motivations for engaging in multimedia production, which are as personal and self-preservational as they are social and relational. 

Ricarose Roque and Natalie Rusk will present examples of how young people are reflecting on their own development in the Scratch online community. They will show how youth are creating different types of projects to express evolving interests, skills, goals, and friendships. These projects provide a lens for looking at how youth are constructing their development over time in a creative online community. 

Each presentation will include examples of projects and practices that express the active, but often invisible work of teaching, learning, and identity development. Based on their findings, the panelists will suggest ways of using digital media to help young people and the adults in their lives grow in self-knowledge and critical awareness as they navigate developmental and professional milestones.


Friday October 6, 2017 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Emerald Bay A

3:00pm

Break
Friday October 6, 2017 3:00pm - 3:15pm
Pacific Ballroom D

3:15pm

BBC School Report: Delivering digital training for better student journalism
The BBC's School Report project gives 11-16 year olds the chance to share their views and make their own stories about subjects that matter to them – their lives and their communities. 

We want to see more young people’s voices on the BBC's output. To inspire more contributions to this project we are building a digital product that will help students to create broadcast quality journalism.

I propose a session where we talk through the life-cycle of this product from its inception through to discovery and launch. The talk will focus on how we identify the needs of our participants and work with schools, teachers and pupils to ensure we build a product that delivers learning outcomes for the users and increases the quality of the content they produce.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schoolreport

I would be more than happy to share this talk with someone doing something similar for schools in the US. It would be interesting to compare digital learning projects that focus on journalism outreach programs for schools. 

Media literacy and our understanding of news (fake or otherwise) has never been more talked about. It's an important time for media organisations to work with educators and help the next generation of content creators hone their skills.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew Leimdorfer

Andrew Leimdorfer

Product Manager, BBC
I work on Digital Products, primarily online tools used by journalists at the BBC. One of the projects I'm working on is about helping schools teach young people about journalism and specifically about the kind of journalism we do at the BBC. |


Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Woods ABC

3:15pm

Creating Explorers & Risk Takers: Foster Emotional Intelligence through Civic Engagement and Minecraft
An urban educator and game designer join forces to share an innovative approach they’ve used to create explorers and risk takers while engaging diverse learners in Minecraft. Join us as we share strategies developed for addressing civic engagement and building emotional intelligence.

This deep dive will explore issues of:
- Equity & Access: Lower the barriers to provide opportunities and engagement
- Girls & Tech: Programming strategies geared toward girls and their interest
- Skill Development: 21st Century & Digital Literacy

Speakers

Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Pacific Ballroom A

3:15pm

Digital Alchemy of Networked Narratives: A Connected Course of Web Storytelling & E-Literature
Seeking to transform what is possible in the real world via a fictional community and exercising collective civic imagination, we launched Elements of Networked Narratives or #NetNarr as an experiment in “digital alchemy” (http://netnarr.arganee.world).

Offered as a Spring 2017 Digital Storytelling course at Kean University, we invited colleagues on a global scale open participants. #NetNarr is an open collaboration delivered in emergent improv style, a laboratory mix of Mia’s Writing Electronic Literature course and DS106 -- where Connected Course-style participants write in their own digital spaces which are aggregated in a course hub. 

Participants in #NetNarr inhabited personas, remixed digital media, and explored the role of multiple identities in networked spaces. It included “virtual field trips”, live video visits with international artists & scholars to explore the latest in digital storytelling, electronic literature, fan fiction, and #netprov. Taking a cue from the age of alchemy (often thought of as closeted pseudoscientists concocting formulas to make gold from common substances), #NetNarr sought narrative transformations while co-building a “mirrorworld” inspired by current conversations.

Our students gained experience with memes and GIFs, twitter bots, web/audio annotation, text/graphic ciphers, audio editing, creation of alt personas. A core group of open participants, despite often not having clear rules of engagement, persisted with us, and even independently created their own #Netnarr activities. 

#NetNarr is an experiment in designing for narrative emergence and teaching itself as a narrative-based experience. As budding digital alchemists, we have not been constrained by what we do not know. We even have rogue characters who “hacked” our class. 

In our presentation we will share a unique community as we consider the intersection of co-learning, networks, civic imagination, pedagogy, and digital writing/making. We will also reflect on the role that “co-imagineering” and ARG practices (alternative reality games) might play in addressing real world challenges. This was our pilot for a flexible approach to teaching, not on the web as content, but in the web as a space of its own. We hope our ideas inspire you to join us for a next iteration in 2018.

Speakers

Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Pacific Ballroom B

3:15pm

Hashtag Professionals: Teachers' Development and Negotiation within Affective Publics for Disciplinary, Political, and Personal Development
Amidst the proliferation of digital technologies, there remains a gap in pedagogies that appropriately prepare teachers to use technology in transformative ways (Somekh, 2008; Ottenbreit-Leftwich et al., 2010, 2012; Hicks & Turner, 2013). Research points to a need for literacy teachers to respond more robustly to multimodal, multiliteracies (Ajayi, 2010; Cope and Kalantzis, 2000).

Our intervention at UC Berkeley course involved integrating participatory (Ito, Jenkins, boyd, 2015) learning elements including intergenerational social media experiences. Papacharissi (2015) argues that hashtags “serve as framing devices that allow crowds to be rendered into publics; networked publics that want to tell their story collaboratively” and on “on their own terms.” These “bonds of sentiment” are visceral and politically consequential. Twitter chat participants can attest to their unifying power, the instantaneous thrill of connecting with others. My work with preservice teachers evidences shifts in their response to the medium: from a space for leisure to one for which they identify serious professional learning potential.

Using qualitative analysis software to explore the social media patterns of students in my preservice teacher education classroom, this session will explore the potentials of Twitter as an affective public. In a national context where teacher burnout, turnover, and low morale are prevalent, teacher uptake bears political as well as disciplinary potential.

Affective publics, as an instantiation of affinity groups (Gee, 2000) with distributed knowledge, afford teachers ability to be aggregators of information rather than all-knowing experts. 

Implications of this work will be discussed in terms of potential for teacher development across disciplines, including technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge development (Mishra and Koehler, 2006). In keeping with the original theorization of affective publics, implications will also be explored for their political potential.


Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay DE

3:15pm

Implementing a Digital College Access Initiative: Four Profiles of Engagement
Low-income youth who are high academic achievers throughout high school are still at significant risk of not applying to college (Arbona & Nora, 2007). Many of these students also run the risk of under-matching, or not applying to the academically rigorous institutions they are qualified for (Roderick, Coca, & Nagaoka, 2011). In the absence of adequate funding for college guidance counselors in low-income school communities, what affordable alternatives offer students the support they need to apply, get accepted to, and persist in college? Do digital platforms and games have the potential to supplement the guidance provided by counselors and teachers? How can digital initiatives best be implemented at the school level? 

Two years ago, our team at the University of [removed for blind review] implemented a digital college access initiative in high schools across California to improve college and financial aid outcomes. The intervention involved a role-playing video game and an online competition where students earned points by playing the game, reading articles about college, and engaging in other activities meant to increase their college knowledge. In this spotlight presentation, we offer a deep dive into how implementation progressed at four diverse case study sites. We will highlight the diverse ways that teachers, counselors and administrators facilitated student engagement with the digital tools including how they surmounted barriers to technology access. We will also review mixed methods data on student outcomes. Our goal is to make recommendations for researchers, designers, and educators who want to undertake similar types of digital interventions, as well as to offer insights about bringing digital school-wide initiatives to scale. 

Arbona, C., & Nora, A. (2007). The influence of academic and environmental factors on Hispanic college degree attainment. The Review of Higher Education, 30(3), 247-269.

Roderick, M., Coca, V., & Nagaoka, J. (2011). Potholes on the road to college: High school effects in shaping urban students’ participation in college application, four-year college enrollment, and college match. Sociology of Education, 84(3), 178-211.


Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay A

3:15pm

Modelling Participatory Design in Digital Humanities Pedagogy and Research
With the support of the Mellon-funded Digital Bridges Initiative, the semester-long course, “Museum without Walls,” invites students to conduct new research and engage digital interface development related to the history of the Intermedia program at the University of Iowa. Renowned as one of the first MFA programs that encouraged art students to work across disciplines in their research and practice, Intermedia produced work that often integrated new technologies and media. 

Focused on the study of a partially digitized corpus of videos made by students, faculty, and visiting artists between 1969-2003 in the program, the course pursues art historical lines of inquiry that also raise fundamental questions about how we catalog and categorize each artifact. Videos, especially those produced in the context of performance, are often the product of collaborative effort and the result can be seen as documentation and/or artwork. Because videos, even when digitized, are not machine readable, appropriate metadata is one of the few ways this material can become robustly accessible. Students generate metadata descriptions that enable the development of a research portal to this corpus of video artifacts. To be offered every year, this course is fundamentally iterative: each semester, we build upon the work previous students have completed as researchers, designers, and contributors to a growing database of videos. 

Given the technical, theoretical, and historical parameters of the course, its resources, organization, and design has also drawn upon the expertise of library specialists, digital humanities researchers, art historians, and museum professional. Graduate and undergraduate assistants conduct preliminary research and students in the course deepen the content and work collaboratively on interface design and development. What emerges is a model of participatory design, which, Bratteteig and Gregory have argued, fundamentally understands “design as change” and seeks “to include future users in most parts of the design process, even as co-designers.” By engaging multiple constituents in the process of research, interface design, and metadata determination, the course models participatory design in digital humanities pedagogy and resource development.


Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay B

3:15pm

Tide Pools and Technology: Virtual Learning in State Parks
Francesca Henderson, park ranger at Crystal Cove state park in Laguna Beach, California, has been teaching Castlebay Lane Charter Elementary's kindergarten class about the park’s natural wonders for the past few weeks. But the students are more than 80 miles away nestled in their classroom in Porter Ranch. Thanks to new technology, Henderson is able to interact with these students remotely, providing on-site demos while answering questions in real-time. This school year, Henderson will engage over 7,000 students most of which are California communities unable to make an educational field trip to the beach.

Over a decade ago California State Parks established a distance learning program called PORTS (Parks Online Resources for Teachers and Schools). Using video conferencing technology and high speed data connections, PORTS enables park rangers to interact with kids in real time, taking them on virtual field trips in 10 California State Parks. Units of study include topics such as kelp forests, redwood ecology, monarch butterfly migration and historical subjects like the Gold Rush.

PORTS is constantly looking for ways to employ technology to enhance learning experiences and to provide engaging experience for students and recently partnered with Belkin to help with hardware and software solutions that make real-time communication easier and more fun.

Belkin’s Tablet Stage is an adjustable platform transforming any tablet into an interactive presentation tool. The Tablet Stage has been added to indoor studios and remote ranger vehicles like the EduGator, which functions as a mobile studio. With this enhanced functionality, park rangers are now able to use the iPad as a document camera and video presentation system to better showcase the park’s natural, cultural, and historical resources. 

By also installing the Tablet Stage in the classroom, teachers have the ability to customize the view for their students and park rangers are able to see the entire classroom and speak directly with students who can ask questions and share their experience with park staff. The accompanying Stage App lets rangers annotate over live video and draw on the screen, enabling a truly interactive learning experience.

The new features have expanded the quality and reach of the customized online learning solutions. This school year, the program will serve 100 school districts statewide and reach more than 50,000 students. During this session, Brittany Lollier and Brad Krey will share insights from the program and will incorporate an actual demo with a park ranger so attendees can experience firsthand the power of these virtual field trips.

Speakers
avatar for Brittany Lollier

Brittany Lollier

Marketing Manager, Belkin International Business and Education Division
Brittany Lollier is a marketing manager at Belkin and is responsible at the global level for strategically promoting the Belkin brand. Using meticulous research and the voices of customers to devise global marketing strategies, she oversees the marketing planning, budget and exec... Read More →


Friday October 6, 2017 3:15pm - 3:45pm
Emerald Bay C

3:45pm

Break
Friday October 6, 2017 3:45pm - 4:00pm
Pacific Ballroom D

4:00pm

Ignite Presentations!
Ignite talks are radically different from traditional conference talks. You will be dazzled by humor, wit, energy and inspiration packed into one powerful five-minute talk. 

Ignite Talks will be hosted by Sybil Madison-Boyd.

Speakers:

Matthew Farber, University of Northern Colorado

Gabrielle Lyon, Chicago Architecture Foundation

Mark Warschauer, University of California, Irvine

Kelsey Hammer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Jerome, Green

Michael John, University of California, Santa Cruz




Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Matthew Farber

Matthew Farber

Assistant Professor, University of Northern Colorado
Matthew Farber, Ed.D. is an Assistant Professor of Technology, Innovation, and Pedagogy at the University of Northern Colorado. He is an Edutopia blogger, a Certified BrainPOP Educator, and he is in the iCivics Educator Network. His book, Gamify Your Classroom: A Field Guide to G... Read More →
JG

Jerome, Green

Founder, MOSAYEC
KH

Kelsey Hammer

Digital Literacy Graduate Assistant, R.B. House Undergraduate Library
GL

Gabe Lyon

Vice President, Education and Experience, Chicago Architecture Foundation
MW

Mark Warschauer

Professor, University of California, Irvine


Friday October 6, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Pacific Ballroom D

5:00pm

Student Center on a loop to Hotel Irvine and Duke (1 Shuttle)
Pick-up area is adjacent to the main UCI administration building. Please ask registration desk for directions on how to get there.

Friday October 6, 2017 5:00pm - 5:30pm
Admin Building (by Flagpole)